Andy Murray can come back from hip surgery, says doubles legend Bob Bryan

first_img Reuters MelbourneJanuary 16, 2019UPDATED: January 16, 2019 15:56 IST Andy Murray went down fighting in the first round of the Australian Open (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSAndy Murray suffered a first round defeat at the Australian Open on MondayMurray has been suffering from a right hip injury for nearly two years nowBob Bryan has urged Murray to undergo a hip surgeryDoubles veteran Bob Bryan, who has made a successful return to competitive tennis following hip surgery, has urged Andy Murray to have the same operation but also warned the Briton that it could end his hopes of a comeback.Murray was eliminated from the first round of the Australian Open on Monday, and said the match could be the last of his professional career, with the pain of his right hip having become unbearable.The three-times Grand Slam champion said he would decide whether to have surgery within a week or push on through the pain to farewell fans at Wimbledon.Bryan, who has won 23 Grand Slam titles in men’s and mixed doubles, and an Olympic gold medal with twin brother Mike, cut his 2018 season short in May and had hip surgery in August before returning to competitive tennis this year.He said he had not advised Murray either way but hoped he would get the surgery to at least improve his quality of life.”I’m just telling him, I feel great, quality of life is great, practices are going well,” said 40-year-old Bryan.”Maybe I’m not 100 percent yet, but I’m only five months. The doctors said this is more of like a seven or eight months until you feel perfect.”Until I feel that, I can’t give you the guarantee, but I think he’s to the point where this is probably his last option.”I would love to see him do it just for quality of life. You can sleep, walk, be with your kids, play. It’s frustrating when you can’t put on your shoes.”advertisementBryan conceded that he was unsure how Murray’s hip would hold up under the comparatively greater strain of singles.”I never once told him this is the way to go because I do see that singles is a different monster,” he said.”Those guys are really sliding around, killing themselves for four hours. Who knows if this joint would hold up.”It’s not going to break, but who knows if you have that little explosiveness needed to be super quick on the singles court. If you’re a step slow, it’s very exposed out there on a singles court.”While limping and grimacing between points, a typically dogged Murray bowed out of Melbourne with a brave defeat in five sets to 22nd seeded Spaniard Roberto Bautista Agut.An emotional Bryan struggled to compose himself in the media conference as he spoke of Murray’s tearful media conference on Friday when he said he would likely retire this year.”I stayed up till three in the morning watching all the tributes on social media,” he said.”It really hit a nerve with me. I mean, he’s a special guy. No one has a heart like him. I think you guys saw the response he got from everyone.””I personally think he can [come back from the surgery],” he added.”But, you know, there’s no evidence that it’s possible in tennis. I mean, so much wear and tear. But I think he could do it.”Also Read | Maybe I’ll see you again: Andy Murray tells Australian Open crowd after Round 1 exitAlso Watch:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byJepher Nickels Tags :Follow Andy MurrayFollow Bob Bryan Next Andy Murray can come back from hip surgery, says doubles legend Bob BryanBob Bryan has urged Andy Murray to have a hip operation but also warned the Briton that it could end his hopes of a comeback.advertisementlast_img read more

Sergei Polunin bad boy of ballet I felt tricked by jealous Royal

first_imgHe rocked the arts establishment with his shock departure from the Royal Ballet in 2012, being labelled the “bad boy of ballet” for his colourful exploits and rumours of his temperament.Now Sergei Polunin, the prodigy regularly called the greatest dancer of his generation, has lifted the lid on his surprise exit from Covent Garden, saying he felt he had been “tricked” into life in ballet.Polunin, who is the star of a new biographical documentary about his rise and fall, said he had believed becoming the “best dancer in the world” would allow him to earn enough to bring his Ukrainian family back together, and make the most of his creativity.Instead, he claims, he was left sharing a flat, living like a child and unable to afford to pay for dinner, with a “jealous” company which would not give him freedom to work in other styles. Sergei Polunin photographed in 2013 I became a principal and I couldn’t even afford to pay for dinnerSergei Polunin Sergei Polunin in a Royal Ballet production of Sleeping Beauty in 2011 Natalia Osipova and Sergei Polunin in Run Mary Run “The company is so jealous. They won’t let you work elsewhere. They won’t even let you use a style from elsewhere.“You work so hard: 11 hours a day, six days a week. “It isn’t human. I didn’t know what life was.”Polunin, who became the youngest principal in the Royal Ballet’s history at the age of 19, was born in the Ukraine to mother Galina and father Vladimir. Initially taking up gymnastics, his potential was spotted by teachers and he transferred to ballet, winning a place at the Choreographic Institute in Kiev. “The company sort of owns you. I thought about my future. In 10 years’ time, I would be in the same position as when I started – the best dancer in the world, but still sharing a flat. You’re an adult, but you live like a kid.”Stressing that the same problems also existed in other ballet companies, he told the Observer: “I got disappointed with people, too. It wasn’t a team.“The ballet world is so competitive, and for no reason. It’s not a sport. It’s an art. There’s no winner. He has now suggested dancers ought to be assigned agents in the same way as professional footballers, giving them guidance and representing their financial interests.In an interview about the film, Dancer, Polunin said: “You know when you believe in Christmas? I was like that with ballet.“I thought I would reach a level where I’d have enough money to bring my family back together, and I would have freedom.“I believed a lot of things, then I started to question them.“The Royal Ballet was good to me. They gave me everything I asked for. It’s just…I felt tricked.“I became a principal and I couldn’t even afford to pay for dinner. I couldn’t afford a flat.center_img Sergei Polunin in a Royal Ballet production of Sleeping Beauty in 2011 Natalia Osipova and Sergei Polunin in Run Mary Run Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. To pay for his tuition, his father and grandmother moved abroad – to different countries – to work while his mother stayed to supervise him.He went on to the prestigious Royal Ballet school at 13, moving alone without speaking any English, and his parents eventually separated.He has previously spoken movingly about how he had believed earning money from his dancing could reunite his family, and the disappointment of realising it could not.In 2012, at the age of 21, he walked out of rehearsals in Covent Garden one day and told the company he would not return, intending to give up ballet altogether. He has since performed in Russia  and moved into contemporary dance, striking up a long-term relationship with fellow ballet star Natalia Osipova, whom he credits with “calming” him. Now 27, he said of his decision to leave the Royal Ballet:”It’s true that I got a bit lost afterwards. But that was because I didn’t have any mentoring, and I had grown up in a system where I never made my own decisions.“I had a bad rehearsal, and that was it. Complete freedom.”The Royal Ballet declined to comment on Polunin’s views.The film, Dancer, is released in cinemas on March 10th. Sergei Polunin photographed in 2013last_img read more