KPC to Double Crude Export to China

first_imgzoom Kuwait Petroleum Corporation (KPC) has signed a historic deal with China’s Unipec which will see almost doubling of KPC’s shipments of crude to China.This is a milestone deal for KPC, under which, as of 2014 KPC will provide Unipec crude oil with the volume expected to reach 300,000 barrels per day (bpd). The amount equals to one VLCC heading from Kuwait to China on daily basis.The ten-year contract, that replaces the previous 160,000-170,000 bpd supply agreement, will see involvement of Kuwait Oil Tanker’s fleet.“With new and mutual cooperation between the two parties, there is a good sign of increasing the volume of our crude oil exports to China up to 500,000 bpd in the next three years,” KPC’s Managing Director of International Marketing, Nasser Al Mudhaf, told Kuwait’s News Agency (KUNA).“The deal comes at a right time, because this is the first contract on C&F basis with the use of our own vessels to deliver crude oil. It will help smooth operation, production and exports from Kuwait.“China is our new outlet where we will use more than 50% of our fleet for deliveries of crude oil,” he went on to say.World Maritime News Staff, August 25, 2014last_img read more

Catastrophe star Rob Delaneys twoyearold son dies of cancer

first_imgI am desperately sad right now, but I can say with authority that there is good in this world.Rob Delaney The actor previously said it would be bad parenting for him to return to the US, praising London, the BBC and the NHS in the UK Credit:Ian West/PA “The NHS nurses and doctors and the home carers and charity workers who helped our family survive Henry’s illness will be my heroes until the day I die. I am desperately sad right now, but I can say with authority that there is good in this world.”Thank you, beautiful Henry, for spending as much time with us as you did. We miss you so much,” Delaney added.Last year the US star, who lives in London, said it would be “bad parenting” if he moved back to the States with his children in the current political climate. “Our family would be in much worse shape right now if it weren’t for them. I would also urge you to take concrete and sustained action to support the NHS, however you can. Do not take it for granted. “I am astonished by the love-in-action displayed by Henry’s mom and his brothers.”They are why I will endeavour to not go mad with grief. I don’t want to miss out on their beautiful lives. I’m greedy for more experiences with them.”Delaney called Henry a “joy” and praised the NHS nurses and doctors, home carers and charity workers who helped during his illness.”He was smart, funny, and mischievous and we had so many wonderful adventures together, particularly after he’d moved home following fifteen months living in hospitals,” he added.He said he was “desperately sad” and urged people to help other families in the UK with sick children by supporting the Rainbow Trust or Noah’s Ark organisations. He said he was concerned about US President Donald Trump’s stance on healthcare, and will not return.”In the United States of America you could be denied healthcare if you have a pre-existing condition, which can literally include ‘has had a child’,” Delaney told the Radio Times.”It would be bad parenting for me to bring children back to that country.”He said: “I’m crazy about London, I love it so much. I love the NHS. I love the BBC. I love the Tube. I love the bus. I love tea. I love bacon sandwiches, I really do.” The actor previously said it would be bad parenting for him to return to the US, praising London, the BBC and the NHS in the UK  Catastrophe star Rob Delaney has revealed his two-year-old son Henry has died.The actor and writer, 41, said his family were devastated following the toddler’s death from cancer in January in a lengthy statement on Facebook.Henry had surgery and treatment to remove a brain tumour shortly after turning one in 2016 before the cancer returned last autumn.He had been left with significant physical disabilities by the tumour, Delaney said, but had “quickly learned sign language and developed his own method of getting from A to B shuffling on his beautiful little bum”.”His drive to live and to love and to connect was profound,” he added. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more