NDP leader calls on Harper to defend supply management in its entirety

NDP leader calls on Harper to defend supply management ‘in its entirety’ OTTAWA – Prime Minister Stephen Harper should defend supply management “in its entirety” during negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, says NDP leader Tom Mulcair.Harper’s most recent remarks on the trade talks have created uncertainty for Canadian egg, poultry and dairy producers, Mulcair writes in a letter to the prime minister.Supply management relies on marketing boards to control domestic production of eggs, milk, cheese and poultry and high import tariffs to protect against foreign producers.“I am urging you to commit to defending supply management in its entirety and reassure Canadians that it will be protected in all future negotiations,” Mulcair writes in the letter, sent late last week.“Concessions in supply management sectors could have profoundly negative effects on our regional economies.”Mulcair also stressed the importance of the policy in his home province.“In Quebec alone, nearly 7,000 family farms exist and prosper thanks to supply management, which also accounts for 92,000 jobs and 43 per cent of total agricultural revenue.”Last Thursday, Harper said Canada is “working to protect” the supply management system while it participates in the trade talks.“I believe these negotiations are going to establish what will become the basis of the international trading network in the Asia Pacific. It is essential in my view that Canada be part of that — that the Canadian economy be part of that,” Harper said.“At the same time, we are working to protect our system of supply management and our farmers in other sectors.”Max Moncaster, a spokesman for Trade Minister Ed Fast, denied media reports from last week that said the government was prepared to make concessions on supply management.“Our government is committed to defending our system of supply management,” he said in a statement.“Unlike Thomas Mulcair, who has consistently opposed Canada’s free trade agreements and advocated against Canada’s economic interests on the world stage, our government will continue to promote Canadian trade interests across all sectors of our economy, including supply management.”The TPP is currently being negotiated by 12 countries including Canada, Australia, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam.The government says TPP countries represent 792 million people and a combined GDP of $28.1 trillion, which is about 40 per cent of the global economy.One of the central complaints from opposition parties has been the secrecy surrounding the talks, which have gone on behind closed doors.The government has also faced strong opposition from dairy and poultry farmers who want supply management preserved.Some groups, including the Dairy Farmers of Canada, have expressed concerns about how the trade deal could increase access to the Canadian dairy market.In a 2014 report, the Conference Board of Canada said supply management “effectively transfers resources from poorer Canadians to wealthier Canadians” and called for the policy to be dismantled or dramatically retooled. NDP Leader Tom Mulcair speaks at a rally in Ottawa on Wednesday, June 17, 2015. Mulcair is urging Stephen Harper to defend Canada’s supply management system “in its entirety” in the course of negotiating the Trans-Pacific Partnership. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang by Kristy Kirkup, The Canadian Press Posted Jun 29, 2015 2:22 pm MDT Last Updated Jun 29, 2015 at 5:08 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

Met Office warns Britain is heading for unprecedented winter rainfall with records

first_imgThe estimate reflects natural variability plus changes in the UK climate as a result of global warming. Professor Adam Scaife who led the research said: “The new Met Office supercomputer was used to simulate thousands of possible winters, some of them much more extreme than we’ve yet witnessed.“This gave many more extreme events than have happened in the real world, helping us work out how severe things could get.” Cornish village of Coverack hit by flash flood  Dr Vikki Thompson, lead author of the report, said “Our computer simulations provided one hundred times more data than is available from observed records. Our analysis showed that these events could happen at any time and it’s likely we will see record monthly rainfall in one of our UK regions in the next few years”Its research suggests there is a one in three chance of a new monthly rainfall record in at least one region each winter.It comes as flash flooding caused significant damage in the Cornish town of Coverack last week and left people stranded in their homes. Analysis revealed there is a seven per cent risk of record monthly rainfall in south east England in any given winter. The figure increased to 34 per cent when other regions of England and Wales were considered. The winter of 2013-14 saw the heaviest rain fall in a century after a series of storms hit the UK leading to extensive flooding in several parts of the country.center_img Britain is heading for “unprecedented” winter rainfall after the Met Office’s new super computer predicted records will be broken by up to 30 per cent.Widespread flooding has hit the UK in the past few years leading meteorologists to search for new ways to “quantify the risk of extreme rainfall within the current climate”.The Met Office’s new supercomputer has been crucial to understanding the risk of record rainfall by creating hundreds of realistic UK winter scenarios in addition to the record.  Cornish village of Coverack hit by flash flood Credit:Matt Cardy  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more