Marshall’s Latest Headphones Snip the Wires from Top of the Line Model

first_imgFor some time now, Marshall has been selling headphones that bear the classic look of the company’s amplifiers. In 2016, the company started selling wireless headphones, but only on-ear models were available. That has changed with the release of the company’s new Marshall Monitor Bluetooth headphones.Like the company’s previous headphones, the Monitor Bluetooth model uses a black-and-gold color scheme, with a hint of white in the form of the Marshall logo emblazoned on the side of the ear cups. While this model is over-ear instead of on-ear, much of the general design and build seems very similar to earlier models like the Mid and Major. Like those models, the Monitor Bluetooth uses cast-metal hinges and an overall rugged build that means the headphones should survive the rigors of everyday use.The Monitor Bluetooth headphones feature 40mm drivers, similar to the company’s previous wireless models which used drivers of the same size and offered surprisingly warm and detailed sound for the price. Considering this is a wireless version of the older Marshall Monitor headphones, this shouldn’t come as a surprise. Connectivity is provided by Bluetooth with aptX, which may not satisfy audiophiles, but is perfect for those looking to use the headphones on the go.Aside from the looks, one of the major selling points of the Monitor Bluetooth is the battery life. Marshall claims the headphones are capable of delivering more than 30 hours of playback time on a single charge. If you do happen to run out of battery, the included 3.5mm cable lets you listen in passive mode, and the headphones can be easily charged via the micro USB charging cable. Both of these cables will fit inside the included canvas carrying bag so you always have them with you.The Marshall Monitor Bluetooth headphones are available starting Thursday, and sell for $250. For more information or to snag a pair for yourself, see the company’s website.A version of this post first appeared on our “brother site” Digital Trends. Grovemade Redefines What a Headphone Stand Can Be Editors’ Recommendations The Best Wired and Wireless Headphones for Travel What to Wear on a Red-Eye Flight: Fashionably Comfortable Apparel for the Long Haul The Best Wireless Charging Pads and Stands, No Strings Attached 8 Best Wireless Headphones for Running: What to Know Before You Buy last_img read more

Sonic Drillings Ray Roussy joins the International Mining Technology Hall of Fame

first_imgDeveloper of the sonic drill, Canadian Ray Roussy will be inducted in the Exploration category at the gala dinner in the Brown Palace Hotel, Denver on February 16 (www.im-halloffame.com). Roussy, President of Sonic Drilling Ltd and the Sonic Drill Corp is the patent holder and the developer of modern day sonic drilling technology – a technology that has made a significant impact on the mining industry. Today, seven out of 10 sonic rigs are purchased for mining exploration. Although the diamond drill has long been the preferred tool for mineral exploration in hard rock, in unconsolidated material, it has two unfortunate drawbacks. First, it doesn’t drill well in unconsolidated materials and, secondly, it can’t provide accurate core samples from that kind of formation. Only a sonic drill can recover a continuous core including boulders, clays, silt, sand and gravel and lay it in its stratigraphic sequence – from the surface all the way down to 100 m and deeper.Using Roussy’s innovative sonic drill head, samples, ranging from 3” to 8” in diameter, can be obtained from a wide variety of mineral deposits including hard-to-extract oil sands, slag piles, mine tailings and heap leach pads. Extruded into clear plastic sleeves and then neatly laid out, these core samples can be subjected to a detailed visual examination and analysis, followed by sampling, photographing and archiving for a permanent record of the existing mineral conditions and a comprehensive evaluation.Building his first sonic drill rig in his backyard more than 30 years ago, Roussy’s lifetime work has resulted in three prestigious awards, thanks to the unique features of his sonic drilling technology. The Roussy sonic drill head can:Drill three to five times faster (some users report ten times faster)Produce 70% less mess on siteDrill without the use of drilling mudDrill through mixed soils with easeProduce continuous core samples to 100 m+Use 50% less powerOffer many environmentally-friendly benefits including less noise, less waste, lighter engines, reduced fuel consumption, a smaller footprint and “green” hydraulic oil.Roussy’s sonic drill has overcome all of the traditional hurdles to cost-effective mineral exploration in unconsolidated material, making him a worthy member of the International Mining Technology Hall of Fame.The Sonic drilling technology has recently been nominated for a fourth award. The Northern Ontario Institute of Technology (NOIT) has nominated Roussy for an Ontario Premier’s award.Roussy is an alumni of NOIT where he was first introduced to mechanical engineering before continuing onto Lakehead University where he graduated with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering degree in 1974.Today, 40 years later, Roussy holds dozens of patents involving sonic drilling technology and is solely responsible for the successful commercialisation of it when others failed to make it work. If Roussy wins the Ontario Premier’s award, it will be the fourth award since 2008 for his technology.Today, award-winning sonic drill rigs, patented and built by the Sonic Drill Corp, are in use on six continents and in every application imaginable. Due to its non-intrusive abilities, sonic drilling technology has often been used (and specifically requested in government contracts) for sensitive projects such as dam remediation, nuclear site investigations and hazardous waste site reclamation.Because vibrations from the drill bit are not transmitted very far beyond the drill, penetrations can occur into very sensitive areas such as critical eco-systems, unstable terrain or vulnerable situations where traditional drilling would cause more harm or be impossible to complete.Initially, sonic drilling technology was seen as a powerful environmental investigation drill due to its ability to provide undisturbed core samples but, now, the technology has broadened in use to excel at geothermal installations, piling and mineral exploration.last_img read more

Leach thickener upgrade by FLSmidth boosts performance at gold mine

first_imgFollowing test work, a process review and structural analysis of the bridge and thickener tank, the FLSmidth team recommended a combination of the E-DUCÒ feed dilution technology and the E-Volute™ feedwell. The E-DUCÒ system uses feed stream momentum to induce large volumes of feed dilution prior to the feedwell, thus optimising flocculation due to improved mixing profiles and residence times.“The E-Volute feedwell is characterised by excellent feed stream energy dissipation, optimal mixing energy and shear profiles. Subsequently, it promotes even feed distribution into the thickener with minimal floccule breakage, therefore improving the overall sedimentation performance. Specialists at the FLSmidth Supercentre in Perth completed the project from on-site test work and inspection, to process and mechanical design, fabrication of all components, installation, and finally, commissioning. No other OEM has the ability to provide such a breadth and depth of service.”“Having control of the project meant we could keep to the required tight delivery schedule, while remaining in control of quality and planning on-site. This ability helped to shave three full shifts off the installation, allowing the site to return to full production far earlier than they had thought possible,” says Smith.Initial data analysis shows a reduction in flocculant dose of approximately 34% and an increase in underflow density by approximately 2 wt% during the first two months. As the plant continues to optimise the new system under FLSmidth’s recommended control setup, flocculent savings are maintained and underflow densities have increased up to 8 percentage points from 48 wt% to 56 wt% (6% on average), limited only by the rake drive torque.In addition to the achieved flocculent savings, the increase in leach feed density reduced total volumes reporting to the CIL, the minerals recovery process, by around 16.5%. Decreasing cyanide and lime requirements while significantly increasing available leach residence time, promoting gold recovery. The results are such that the 34 m leach feed thickener with FLSmidth technology is producing higher densities than the 44 m tailings thickener with non-FLSmidth OEM technology. Reduced flocculant consumption and improved operational performance are the results of a thickener upgrade at a large Australian gold mine. A leach feed thickener was creating a bottleneck in a gold mine in Western Australia. The installed thickener was a preinstalled ‘off-the-shelf’ product, neither supplied nor installed by FLSmidth. As the on-site maintenance contractor, the client asked FLSmidth’s team of specialists to assess the performance and offer a solution to improve productivity and overall performance. As a result, FLSmidth’s engineers identified several improvements to the thickener’s control set-up.“The customer realised their feed system was under-sized and hampered by air entrainment. The density-reliant dilution system meant that the feed stream was not being diluted, resulting in high flocculant consumption, poor overflow quality and lower than desired underflow density,” explains Dane Smith, Dewatering Product Manager at FLSmidth.last_img read more