Manu Tuilagi – the answer to England’s midfield problems?

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Leicester Tigers Manu Tuilagi in action for LeicesterBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorEngland’s midfield problems have been well documented. While the likes of Chris Ashton and Ben Foden shone during the November Internationals, the same could not be said of the Mike Tindall and Shontayne Hape centre partnership.The fact that Martin Johnson even experimented with Matt Banahan in the No 13 shirt proves that the England management is not convinced by the potency of their midfield – but there is a 19-year-old at Leicester who could prove the answer to those problems.Manu Tuilagi is the youngest of the Samoan family dynasty and has impressed this season with his strong, powerful running, subtle passing skills and, like his brothers, a ferocious defence (just watch this video of his hit on Harlequins’ Tom Williams).The Tigers have been grateful to have his services, too, after the Home Office threatened to deport him in the summer. Leicester, the RFU and three MPs came to his aid and with a work permit secured, Tuilagi has been quick to repay the Tigers for their assistance, scoring five tries already this season.While he was born in Samoa, he was brought up in the UK and has played for England through the age groups. Now he’s being tipped for a place in Johnson’s Six Nations squad and his Leicester team-mate Dan Hipkiss for one believes he deserves an opportunity to prove himself at Test level. Read a rare interview with Manu by clicking here “Because not many people have seen him play, he is still a bit of an unknown quantity in the Aviva Premiership,” says Hipkiss. “But he wont be for long. He has a lot of attributes that the England team could really do with and his physical presence is hugely valuable as the game becomes more fluid.”While his brothers Freddie, Henry, Alesana and Anitele’a have all represented Samoa at international level, Manu has made it clear that he wants to wear the red rose having been part of the England U16, U18 and U20 squads. But he’s not getting carried away about talk of an impending Test debut.Alesana and Manu Tuilagi with Alesana’s daughter“We’ll see what happens about the Six Nations,” says Tuilagi. “What I will say is that England helped me with my work permit, as did Leicester, and I’ve been here for pretty much all my rugby-playing life so that helped me decide that I’d like to play for England, not Samoa.”Someone who knows him better than anyone, his older brother and Leicester team-mate Alesana, is tipping him to beat the rest of the family’s achievements, saying: “My baby brother has more talent and is a better player than the other five Tuilagi boys. If he were called up for England, he’d be ready.”last_img read more

Top 14: Marcel Garvey on the Castres way

first_imgMax Evans, who came to Castres in 2011, lives a couple of doors up and was on hand to offer assistance when the Garveys arrived in the summer of 2012, and the French players in the squad have been similarly supportive. “They’ve taken us under their wing,” explains Garvey. “We’ve been to barbecues, lunches and they’ve done so much to make us feel welcome.”It was that camaraderie that played such an important part in Castres stunning success last season. Lacking the superstar names of Toulon, Racing or Clermont, Castres’ strength is their unity and that’s been maintained this season with the arrival of the new coaching team of Serge Milhas and David Darricarrère. “They’re calm coaches, and they have a confidence in the players that makes it easier for us to go and play the way they want us to,” says Garvey.That ‘way’ is more expansive than what went before at Castres under the previous coaching pair of Laurent Travers and Laurent Labit. “I like the new style,” admits Garvey. “It’s good for me, and Max, and the rest of the backs.” It will be intriguing to see how Castres fare in the Heineken Cup, pooled as they are with Leinster, Northampton and the Ospreys. As Castres showed last season, they’re not one of those French teams who go to pieces the moment they leave their city limits. Home or away, says Garvey, “we’ll go into every match with no fear”.Garvey is particularly relishing the chance to play Northampton, a team he knows well from his 11 years in the Premiership. Not just because the Saints are an old rival but because it will be an opportunity to go head-to-head with arguably the most famous wing in the world right now. “I’ve played against George North once before,” says Garvey. “It was a pre-season friendly for Worcester against the Scarlets in his breakthrough season. He was a unit then and he’s grown into a world-class player. If I get the chance to play against him it will be a challenge, and a great opportunity.” NOT FOR FEATURED Wide man: Castres wing Marcel Garvey rounds the Glasgow defence during a Heineken Cup tie last seasonBy Gavin MortimerLAST SEASON was a funny old one for Marcel Garvey. Seventeen outings for Castres in the Top 14 and just one try, and that in the final game of the regular season against Racing Metro. Wind forward a few months and the 30-year-old winger is in red-hot form, scoring three tries for Castres in their opening two games of the Top 14.So what’s gone on over the summer to bring about the change? A new fitness regime? A freshness of mind? Nothing so complicated, explains Garvey, who was rested for the trip to Bordeaux on Saturday in readiness for Castres’ clash against Stade Francais this Wednesday evening. “It’s just luck, being in the right place at the right time,” he explains. “I felt my form was fine last season but I was just unlucky not to score more tries. But that’s the way it sometimes goes.”Garvey does himself a disservice. The two tries he scored against Grenoble the week before last were both finished in style, with the same sharpness he showed regularly for Gloucester and Worcester. Garvey insists that last season he was similarly incisive, making line breaks and creating tries but never quite getting on the end of a move. That was probably the main reason he missed out on Castres’ extraordinary end to the season, when in the play-offs they beat Montpellier, Clermont Auvergne and Toulon to win their first Top 14 title for 20 years. “I played in the last game of the regular season against Racing but then the coaches made a few changes for the game (quarter-final) against Montpellier,” reflects Garvey. “The boys went well and the coaches stuck with the same side right through to the final.”Champions: Castres celebrate their titleDespite missing out on the final, Garvey describes the day – and the return to the Castres with the Bouclier de Brennus – as one of the most memorable moments of his career. “It was incredible,” he says. “There were 20,000 people to greet us in Castres and the population of the town is only about 50,000.”The passion of the fans is one reason why Garvey finds Castres to his liking. “Before I came to France some people said I’d find it hard to adapt, but that’s not been the case at all. The whole family has taken to the lifestyle and my three kids (aged nine, six and four) have adapted really well. They’ve picked up the language much quicker than me!”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Gloucester last_img read more

Analysis: Five areas England must fix from France defeat

first_img There were some small crumbs of comfort for Stuart Lancaster to take from Paris. Mako Vunipola, Nick Easter and Danny Cipriani excelled from the bench, wing Jack Nowell grafted all evening and the final ten minutes showcased phenomenal fitness levels.But inaccuracies and concentration lapses littered England’s opening 70 minutes. A five-point margin of defeat flattered them. The biggest positive was that such a display happened in rehearsal rather than at Twickenham during the Rugby World Cup. A similar display against Fiji, Wales or Australia would really be a disaster – perhaps tournament-ending.We take a look at five areas that Lancaster and his coaches will be focussing on over the next four weeks.Breakdown discipline and decision-makingCaptain Chris Robshaw refused to sugarcoat a first half that saw England concede seven penalties. The openside flanker bemoaned “shocking” discipline levels. And he was spot on.Five three-pointers were kicked to give France a 15-6 lead at half-time, but just as damaging as scoreboard pressure was the fact that the infringements did not allow England any foothold. At the end of 40 minutes, they could boast just 31 per cent of possession and 30 per cent of territory.Bar the scrum setbacks – which we will come onto later – none of the offences were forced, either. England’s defence made 115 tackles and missed just 13. Aside from Yoann Huget‘s sensational solo try, Andy Farrell’s system stayed firm.This misjudgment from Dan Cole offered up an easy chance for Frédéric Michalak and epitomised some unnecessary overzealousness at the breakdown:An excellent piece of spoiling from Ben Youngs starts off this sequence. He sees Yoann Maestri is holding the ball above the floor for Damien Chouly……and clasps on. Referee Jaco Peyper rules that a maul has been formed, so Youngs must keep the ball above ground to force the turnover:However, Cole comes right around to hold up Chouly from behind:The tighthead would be perfectly legal were this merely a tackle. Peyper’s maul call means Cole should have entered the breakdown from behind the back foot, though. A penalty is awarded to France.Clearly indicating to Peyper that he had not heard the maul declared, Cole feels hard done by:Of course, his annoyance does not matter. The result means it was a poor decision, just like a later intervention from James Haskell:This situation comes about as England are on the front foot. Joe Launchbury has charged down Michalak and, though Mathieu Bastareaud covers well before outstripping Billy Vunipola, Cole and Courtney Lawes take the centre low.Haskell has made up a great deal of ground, as the below screenshot shows:And swoops to compete for the ball on the floor:However, Peyper adjudges that Haskell is not supporting his own bodyweight:France could kick to touch, relieving pressure and building an attacking platform to test England once more. Les Bleus had been let off the hook by sheer overeagerness.All eight members of England’s pack were starting their first match of the  season. While these mistakes were slightly worrying, rustiness was probably the overriding cause.In a canny selection from Philippe Saint-André – stop sniggering – France deployed a a spine of No 8 Louis Picamoles, lock Maestri and hooker Guilhem Guirado after the same trio received significant game-time at Twickenham last week. As such, France’s pack seemed far more cohesive.England did manage glimpses of class up front. Cole forced a penalty for his team’s first points:The visitors set themselves from a restart and steam up onto Chouly, who is the obvious receiver:Tom Youngs, tireless as ever in the loose, takes the France back-rower low……and shows good discipline to roll away from the tackle area, freeing up Cole to jackal. Billy Vunipola has a subtle role too. He latches on, providing added ballast so it is more difficult for France to clear Cole:This was a rare triumph for England in the first half, though. It started to go wrong from their first very attack.Phase-play organisationLaunchbury batted back Tom Youngs’ opening lineout throw and Nowell bypassed two-would-be tacklers to give England front-foot ball. Then this happened:As Ben Youngs passes out to Billy Vunipola, look at George Ford:Screaming for a pass, the Bath Rugby fly-half has identified that the French defence is rather narrow. Indeed, with five men outside him and the hosts’ wings covering in the back field, there is scope to exploit an overlap from deep:A swivel-pass from the first receiver – a pattern England use often – would have proved dangerous here. Miscommunication means Billy Vunipola trucks it up with just Cole for support. France swarm him and an over-ambitious offload goes to the floor:Ford kicked from the next phase, all impetus from the attack exhausted.In the early exchanges of the second half though, things improved:As Jonny May ships right to Billy Vunipola and the No 8 turns to find Ford, the key man to watch in the France line is skipper Pascal Pape. His shoulders are facing in, anticipating a narrow carry:After a further pass to Burrell, Pape has pinched in and is wrong-footed. The centre has enough space to arc outside his man with ease:England had more joy manipulating the French defence in the final stages, but by then it was too late.Compounding errorsYou can tell a great deal about a team from their reaction to a slip-up. When things are going well, it is easy to forget and move onto the next job. Under the cosh, errors can easily exasperate.When Ford booted downfield from Billy Vunipola’s carry above, an unfortunate chain reaction started:Luther Burrell went into Saturday night seven days after witnessing a fine outing for the midfield combination of Sam Burgess and Henry Slade. The Northampton Saint needed to respond, and his chase here was excellent, completed by a robust challenge on Scott Spedding: Stuart Lancaster knows his England side must improve on their performance in Saturday night’s 25-20 loss at the Stade de France. We pick out five issues to put right before the World Cup. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Plenty to ponder: Stuart Lancaster and Andy Farrell trudge off the Stade de France turf center_img Haskell is on hand to threaten the tackle area and Guirado could have been penalised for entering into the side of the ruck:Instead, Peyper pings Burrell, who is trapped over the ball and impeding France’s attempt to recycle:Spedding got to his feet, brushed himself off and landed a 55-metre penalty to give France a 3-0 lead. Ford then rushed the restart and put it out on the full:One error had become two, and France were back in the ascendancy with a scrum on halfway. Ford finished strongly, but vicious circles can spiral quickly if a player loses their composure for just a second.Set-piece problemsGraham Rowntree is among the premier forwards coaches on the planet and his pride will be hurting. For the second successive game, England endured difficulties at the set-piece.For so long a reliable platform, the lineout went awry quickly. This Tom Youngs’ throw, from good field position, was nicked by Bernard Le Roux:Lifting two jumpers to minimise Youngs’ margin for error, France clearly targeted this area. The feed is not far off its target, but Le Roux cleverly slips his right hand in front of Lawes (blue circle) and his side come away with the ball:Now, Tom Youngs’ statistics in the Aviva Premiership are excellent. He is capable of delivering better arrows, but the calling system clearly needs refinement too.The lineout became another site for English indiscipline too. Here, Robshaw and Lawes combine to stifle a driving maul:Even so, a penalty to France resulted. Panning out, we see that Peyper is watching Billy Vunipola, stationed in midfield:The Saracen encroaches too early. Peyper points him out and blows the whistle, the complaints of Michalak (circled) ringing in his ears:Debutant Jamie George saw his first throw in Test rugby pinched at the front. That said, a subsequent effort demonstrated some excellent core skills:Finding Lawes at the tail at the peak of his jump, England have a pristine launchpad:The scrum was more even, both teams winning four and losing one of their five put-ins.Still, the sight of England getting so comprehensively splintered as they were at this first-half set piece  is not one we are used to:Haskell and Robshaw end up facing 90 degrees to the right of their initial position, underlining the dominance of the French forwards, all of whom have their heads facing towards the England line:Rowntree must patch things up before Ireland visit Twickenham.Choosing the time to go directThree slick tries characterised last weekend’s win for England, but the backline stuttered at the start in Paris, especially from first phase. This move from a lineout broke down as Mike Brown knocked on:Deployed at first receiver, Jonathan Joseph simply takes the wrong option here. As he goes to the line, Bastareaud anticipates a pass out the back to Ford. He begins to drift left, leaving a gap between himself and Michalak.Burrell, coming from out to in on an potent line, could have caused havoc:Instead, Ford receives the ball and Bastareaud slides onto him. Wesley Fofana covers May and Noa Nakaitaci has Brown under close surveillance:This attempted pattern from a scrum was similarly ineffective, Bastareaud halting a lateral move with a burly hit on Nowell:England were far more effective when holding defenders and running punchy angles. Watch Burrell cannon over the gain-line here:A lovely pull-back pass from Launchbury gives Joseph space to take on the France line. He singles out Michalak, who plants his feet, and Burrell can attack the left shoulder of Bastareaud:Haskell found success stepping back towards the ruck shortly after half-time:And these two carries directly foreshadowed Joseph’s try in the 78th minute:Easter’s relationship with clubmate Danny Care comes to the fore here. As the scrum-half darts across the field, he cuts an acute angle against the grain……takes Care’s offload skilfully……and sucks in two French tacklers:England recycle rapidly and Billy Vunipola is next to come off Care’s shoulder. He also steps off his right foot……and both Vincent Debaty and Remi Tales must commit to the tackle: Two phases later, Joseph went over in the left-hand corner. Ford converted to set up a grandstand finish but Lancaster’s charges could not quite land what would have been a ludicrous heist.Now England must use this sharp shock to shake off the rustiness and deliver something far more cohesive when Ireland arrive at Twickenham in a fortnight. Then, we will find out a great deal more about their World Cup prospects.last_img read more

Rugby’s Greatest: John Eales

first_img TAGS: The Greatest Players Rugby World Cup Greatest Players Rugby World Cup Greatest Players He was echoing the thoughts of many.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Australia always seem to raise their game for… Rugby’s Greatest: Martin Johnson Rugby’s Greatest: John EalesHis famous nickname Nobody, as in ‘nobody’s perfect’, is a myth because none of his mates call him that. But everything else you hear about the wonder that is John Eales is true.The Queenslander showed remarkable lineout athleticism at a young age, with England’s Paul Ackford highlighting the youngster’s ability to make space for himself in such a claustrophobic area shortly before the first of Eales’s 86 caps in 1991.Eales was just 20 when he made his Test debut and, though his scrum power and general mobility took a little while to develop, within months he was playing in a World Cup.Coach Bob Dwyer, who had quickly abandoned an experiment to turn him into a No 8, was vindicated by a series of outstanding performances. Together with Rod McCall, Eales won the lineouts 28-2 against Wales and his try-saving tackle on England fly-half Rob Andrew in the final drew gasps – 6ft 7in locks weren’t meant to do that! Expand Collapse LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby’s Greatest: Martin Johnsoncenter_img Expand Towering presence: John Eales leads out the Wallabies before his penultimate Test, at Perth in 2001 (Getty) Major teams: Brothers, QueenslandCountry: Australia
Test span: 1991-2001Test caps: 86 (86 starts)Test points: 173 (2T, 31C, 34P) One of the greatest second-rows to play the… Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Adam Hathaway takes a look at the best… His kicking had already come to notice with an amazing 45m drop-goal for his club Brothers. And a couple of blinding slip catches in a cricket match convinced Queensland coach John Connolly that Eales had the coordination to be a goalkicker – he was to kick 164 Test points, including the last-minute penalty that won the 2000 Bledisloe Cup. Named Wallaby captain at the start of the Greg Smith era in 1996, Eales was to lead his country 55 times – putting him ninth on the all-time list. His high point was a second world title back on British soil in 1999, when Eales became one of only six men at that point to achieve a World Cup double.He had time to beat the British & Irish Lions in 2001 before retiring as the most capped second-row in history, a record since surpassed.Wallaby team-mate Jason Little once said: “It got to the point where I thought Ealsey was going to kick off, catch it himself, go all the way, score the try and kick the goal.” Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guidelast_img read more

Advent campaign from Episcopal Relief & Development

first_imgAdvent campaign from Episcopal Relief & Development Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Advent, Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Relief & Development has launched an Advent campaign at http://www.er-d.org/Advent. An Advent calendar is integrated with the online store of the Gifts for Life catalog. Each day features different stories, prayers, videos and other resources. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Posted Dec 6, 2011 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Relief & Development AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

Benchmarking the parish

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 John Schaffer says: Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Benchmarking the parish Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest September 12, 2012 at 6:25 pm “For when three or four Episcopalians gather together in My name, there is usually a fifth.” Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img By Phyllis StruppPosted Sep 11, 2012 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA September 11, 2012 at 9:09 pm ‘Prayers for American soldiers were said, and names of loved ones serving in the armed forces showed up on the prayer list, but there were no prayers for the enemy.”This was also evident after the death of bin Laden. Many people celebrated the death of another child of God. Rather we should have mourned that he chose to harm others. Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Phyllis Strupp[Episcopal News Service] My deceased father, a D-day veteran, was a lifelong Roman Catholic who went to church every Sunday. He was not in the habit of discussing spiritual matters, but that changed during the church’s sexual abuse scandal. Religion became one of his favorite discussion topics. During one conversation, I asked him how he had reconciled his military service during World War II with the gospel’s teachings to “love your neighbor as yourself” and “love your enemy.” His answer: “I was a young man, and I never gave it any thought. Nor did anyone mention it from the pulpit.”My experience at our local parish in the aftermath of 9/11 was similar, in that nothing was said about the inconsistency between waging war and the gospel. Prayers for American soldiers were said, and names of loved ones serving in the armed forces showed up on the prayer list, but there were no prayers for the enemy. Even in personal conversations and education for ministry theological reflections, it was difficult to broach this subject without an eruption of fear and anger.This raises the question of what type of spiritual engagement one should expect from a Christian community. Regardless of the denomination, we are all striving to follow the teachings of Jesus. Should the parish family be a place where the flock hears challenging views that generate conflict, or a place where the flock can find secure shelter from the storm of what’s going on in the world around us? Should we be discussing issues related to the upcoming presidential election, or avoiding the subject because Democrats and Republicans disagree?Too much conflict generates instability, and too little conflict breeds complacency; both of these situations can have equally devastating effects on a parish’s sense of common mission. Unfortunately, this imbalance is often understood in hindsight, after destructive habits have suffocated the congregation’s spiritual vitality.Parish life should be helping us develop spiritual maturity as followers of Christ. A persistent inability to speak about politics or other contentious topics is a symptom of weak spiritual formation around the teachings of Jesus. But political discussions are not the appropriate benchmark for a parish’s spiritual maturity.If hope is the appropriate benchmark for the Episcopal Church (see Benchmarking the church), what is the secret ingredient that has to be cooking at the individual parishes to create the smell of hope in the denomination?The answer to this question from psychology, neuroscience, or leadership gurus would be “wisdom.” Wisdom is the opposite of one-sided thinking and one-sided brain activity, the source of unmanageable conflicts. The ancient Greeks considered wisdom the root virtue of all other virtues. Positive psychology researchers have defined wisdom as the coordination of knowledge and experience to enhance social wellbeing. Wisdom enables balance between the affective and analytical realms, so that emotions are held in check and knowledge is made useful for the common good.The Bible teaches us that there are two kinds of wisdom, worldly wisdom and divine wisdom, and they are very different, as Paul indicates in I Corinthians 1:25: “For the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom, and the weakness of God is stronger than human strength.”Jesus had an abundance of both types of wisdom, making him as wise as a serpent and as harmless as a dove (Matthew 10:16). He understood that we don’t get wisdom of either type on our own. We must think for ourselves as well as listen to God speaking through others to have the fullness of wisdom that Jesus assures us we will have in a Christian community: “For where two or three gather in my name, there am I with them” (Matthew 18:20).Yet ultimately, wisdom is not evident from what goes on in our heads, according to Jesus in Matthew 11:19: “But wisdom is proved right by her actions.”If theologies, creeds and beliefs cannot be converted into wise actions, they might be doing more harm than good in the parish. Do clergy and lay leaders act in wise ways? Can they speak the truth and hear it? Is there a feeling of trust in the parish and confidence during challenging times? Is the parish known for its faithful actions in the community?A parish with wisdom should be like an oyster, turning grains of irritation into beautiful pearls of wisdom that are seen in actions of service to others.— Phyllis Strupp is the author of Church Publishing’s Faith and Nature curriculum and the author of The Richest of Fare: Seeking Spiritual Security in the Sonoran Desert.Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Kathleen Kuczynski says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls September 12, 2012 at 6:24 pm I believe there are/were some just wars. There would be no Christians in the world today had not we stood up to Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. Further, some radical Islamic groups in today’s world won’t be satisfied until all Christians are wiped off the face of the earth. “Love your neighbor” is an admirable sentiment for us who are blessed to be born in a free country. That freedom was paid with the blood of our men and women in the armed services. It is true that we are all God’s children created in His image; and we should pray that God soften the hearts all that they stop killing each other in His name. But let’s get real. There will be no Christian love if we are all dead. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Comments (3) Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS John Schaffer says: Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

Archbishop says church must ‘join its enemies on their knees’

first_imgArchbishop says church must ‘join its enemies on their knees’ Resorting to violence denies the possibility of redemption Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events April 16, 2014 at 8:17 pm Perhaps the “Anglican Communion” can be seen in terms of the Eastern Orthodox Church. That church is comprised of many autocephalous (independent) churches with a primate over each national church. Hence, the Greek Orthodox Church, Russian Orthodox Church, Serbian Orthodox Church, Romanian Orthodox Church, etc. share the same faith and ecclesiastical polity and are in communion with each other. All Eastern Orthodox primates are equals. However, the Patriarch of Constantinople is given “primacy of honor”. Seems much like the Anglican Communion to me with the Archbishop of Canterbury enjoying “primacy of honor”. Tags Advocacy Peace & Justice, May 11, 2014 at 3:17 pm In a nutshell (no pun intended): People shouldn’t get married if they can’t STAY married! Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Steven Lee says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL April 11, 2014 at 1:54 pm I agree that saying the “Anglican Communion is a global church,” is a mistake. Nowhere in ECUSA Constitution and Canons does it say ECUSA belongs to a global church. Nowhere in the instruments of communion does the Anglican Communion define itself as a global church. Another denomination like the Roman Catholic Church may define itself as that. In fairness to Archbishop Welby, his background is that of a corporate executive for an oil company. He brings a prior business experience regarding power and its structure that may always influence his views on church, society and the world; however, that does not mean his view is correct. Praying for the Archbishop, for those who have suffered violence, and for those who suffer violence because of failure of lay and clerical church leaders not only to speak for peace but also to act in ways that lessen violence and promote peace. Rector Albany, NY Julian Malakar says: April 11, 2014 at 11:12 pm “Anglican Communion is a global church,” if we believe what we say every Sunday while reciting The Nicene Creed. We say “We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church” as we believe in one God. Catholic means universal, inclusive of diversified nationality. Roman Catholic is universal Church under Pope headquarter in Rome. But Anglican Catholic is universal Church inclusive of all nationality 143 countries of the world as Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said. Denying Catholicism means denying our creed. God’s kingdom does not have any political boundaries segregated by color, rich and poor Jeremy Bates says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Steven Lee says: Gun Violence, Comments are closed. Archbishop of Canterbury, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 14, 2014 at 12:54 pm Really? The one church referred to in the Creeds is the Anglican Communion? Please tell us more. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Selena Smith says: Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 10, 2014 at 8:50 pm If only the founders of The Episcopal Church, many of whom had just fought a revolution, and risked their lives, to free themselves from London’s control, could hear this misleading rhetoric…. “The Anglican Communion is a global church.”This is false! The Anglican Communion is a global family of independent churches.Perhaps the Archbishop has self-aggrandizing reasons to say that the Communion is a global church. After all, if that were so, he would be a leading candidate for pope.But that doesn’t make his statement true. May 11, 2014 at 3:18 pm Marriage is not the be all end all! Clergy have every right to say “NO” to homosexual marriages, and if the couple involves doesn’t like it, they can go to another church! Glenn Horton-Smith says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 10, 2014 Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Jeremy Bates says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby spoke April 10 during the Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace: An Episcopal Gathering to Challenge the Epidemic of Violence. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Editors’ note: a correction was made to this article to remove reference to the location of the mass grave where Welby said he had been told Christians were murdered out fear that they might become homosexual because of Western influence.][Episcopal News Service – Oklahoma City, Oklahoma] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said April 10 that “the gospel of peace is reclaimed by loving those who love violence and hatred” and that a church committed to peacemaking “looks like those who join their enemies on their knees.”“We celebrate the fact that as the Anglican Communion functioning as a community of peace across the world, as it does in so many places so wonderfully with such sacrifices, that it manages disagreement well in many places, that it maintains unity across diametrically opposed views on a matter – that that Anglican Communion to which we belong could be the greatest gift to counter violence of all descriptions in our world,” Welby said.Welby spoke during the April 9-11 Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace: An Episcopal Gathering to Challenge the Epidemic of Violence being held at the Reed Center and the nearby Sheraton Midwest City here.He said what is sought is a church “that bears the cross, that is so caught up in Jesus Christ and its relationship with Jesus Christ that it is drawn inexorably in partnership with the poor and pilgrimage alongside them, sharing the surprises and risks of the journey under the leadership of Jesus Christ.”“We do not see such churches today on a global scale, although they may be found in many places at a local level,” he said. “To turn this into a national [phenomenon] such a great and huge nation as this, let alone a global phenomenon, is humanly impossible. We find it easier to be caught up in our own disputes and our own rights.”It must be acknowledged that human beings are inclined towards violence, Welby told the gathering. “Violence is intrinsic to being human, and I have to say in particular to being human and male, or human and powerful, over against minorities of all kinds,” he said. “Moreover it is addictive, violence is addictive, and we become hardened to it.”But, God “is committed to acting in response to wrongdoing” and is a God who judges but also saves, “giving of God’s own self to make an opportunity for rescue,” the archbishop said.Thus, “the resort to violence is always the denial of the possibility of redemption,” he added. “And since in our hearts we believe in redemption as Christians, an early resort to violence denies the very heart of our faith.”However, he said, Holy Week’s anticipation of Easter shows a different way.“It is in accompanying Jesus on the long walk through Holy Week to the cross that we will find ourselves bound together afresh and love released,” Welby said. “The love will be such that we cannot imagine unless we turn to Christ in repentance, seeking to be those who challenge and overcome the violence that he himself bore for us on the cross. It will be a love that comes to reclaim in ourselves and in our communities the gospel of peace.”The text of his speech is here.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Presiding Bishop Katharine JeffertsSchori respond to questions during an April 10 press conference. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSAt a later press conference with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Diocese of Oklahoma Bishop Edward Konieczny, Welby was asked about comments he made April 4 when he told a British radio call-in show that that Christians in parts of Africa face abuse, violence and even death because of decisions on sexual equality made by Anglican Churches in the West. His answer came in response to a question from the Rev. Kes Grant, a Church of England priest and school chaplain who had called in to ask why English clergy were not allowed to decide for themselves whether to marry gay couples.“Why we can’t do it now is because the impact of that on Christians in countries far from here like South Sudan, like Pakistan, like Nigeria, would be absolutely catastrophic and we have to love them as much as the people who are here,” Welby said.Welby explained that while standing at a mass grave he was told that the excuse given for the murder of hundreds of Christians there had been: “If we leave a Christian community in this area, we will all be made to become homosexual, and so we’re going to kill the Christians.”Welby concluded, “The mass grave had 369 bodies in it and I was standing with the relatives. That burns itself into your soul, as does the suffering of gay people in this country.”During the news conference, Welby noted that he had made similar comments in the past and that he was trying to say that “at its heart is the issue that we’re a global church.”“The Anglican Communion is a global church.  And that wherever we speak, whether it’s here or in Africa, or in Asia or in any of the 143 countries in which we are operating, in which there are Anglicans, we never speak exclusively to ourselves but we speak in a way that is heard widely around the world,” he said. “And so the point I was making, because the question was essentially about why don’t we just go ahead and do gay marriages, we have a profound disagreement within the Church of England about the right thing to do, whether to perform gay marriages or have blessing of same sex marriages where the marriage has taken place in the civil system.”Same-sex marriage became legal in England and Wales on March 29. Parliament by a comfortable majority passed The Marriage (Same-sex Couples Act) in July 2013.The Church of England is “starting two years of facilitated conversation about this and we are not going simply to jump to a conclusion, to preempt that conversation in any direction at all but we need to spend time listening to each other, listening to the voices around the communion,” Welby said.The example he gave during the call-in program of his experience at the site of the mass grave “was of a particular example some years back which had had a great impact on my own thinking,” he said during the news conference.Earlier in the day when the archbishop spoke to the entire gathering, he said he and his wife Caroline stood alongside a mass grave in Bor, South Sudan, where the bodies of clergy and lay South Sudanese people were buried in what he has described as a massacre influenced by western acceptance for same-sex marriage.“I think we need to be aware of the realities on the ground in our own countries and around the world and to take those into account when we are moving forward,” Welby said during the news conference.“It doesn’t necessarily mean you do something other than you feel is the right thing to do but you are aware of the need perhaps to do it in a different way,” he continued. “It means particularly in these conversations that we have to make sure that we hear the voice of the LGBT community, which themselves in many parts of the world, including in our own countries suffer a great deal, and we also need to hear very carefully the voices of other members of the church, of other faiths, of ecumenical partners, so that it is a genuine process of listening and in listening to each to listening to the voice of God.”A video clip of Welby’s comments at the news conference is here.Welby came to the United States April 9 from Canada where he had spent four days meeting with Anglican leaders. Towards the end of that visit, Welby sat down for an interview with the Anglican Journal during which he also addressed his April 4 comments in a similar vein.“One of the things that’s most depressing about the response to that interview is that almost nobody listened to what I said; they mostly imagined what they thought I said…It was not only imagination, it was a million miles away from what I said,” he added.Both the Canadian and U.S. visits, which Lambeth Palace has said are “primarily personal and pastoral,” are part of the archbishop’s plan to visit the leader of every Anglican Communion province by the end of this year. Details about his other such visits thus far are here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg and Lynette Wilson are editors/reporters for the Episcopal News Service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace 2014 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN April 11, 2014 at 7:37 am Put plainly, it seems Archbishop of Canturbury Justin Welby is telling us that he believes that acceptance of same-sex relationships in our church is somehow connected, if only in the minds of the killers, to at least one mass murder in Africa, and that he believes African Christians would be further endangered if the Church of England were to quickly move forward on same-sex marriage.I can believe that the archbishop was told an excuse for the killing that involved some connection of Christianity to homosexuality in the minds of the killers. I have little confidence that he or anyone understands the minds of the killers well enough to know whether there would have been less killing if there had been less acceptance, slower acceptance, or no acceptance in our church. I have no confidence in the idea that lives can be saved by delaying sexual equality in the Church of England.The process of Jewish emancipation in the 19th and 20th centuries was about as slow and as widely discussed as anything could be, and throughout that time there were pogroms and other acts of mass violence against them which grew to become the worst imaginable. I don’t see how the archbishop can be sure that a slower process is better. It seems to me at least as likely that the longer the question is undecided, the worse the violence could get.Perhaps I just don’t comprehend the nature of violence. Certainly I don’t understand the archbishop’s statement that “violence is intrinsic to being human.” Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Br. Tikhon Pethoud, CoS Cam says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (8) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

Church jargon jettisoned for better communication

first_imgChurch jargon jettisoned for better communication Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL July 4, 2014 at 12:50 pm Wow, I’m pleasantly surprised to see so many thinking people find problems with this article. It really IS about what we do, how we live, and how integrated we are with what we profess … it’s not just about the language we use. Don’t get me wrong, as a lifelong teacher I think language is important. But there has to be more to it than that, and simply finding new jargon doesn’t make the issues clearer or our mission more profound. July 4, 2014 at 2:10 pm I have a somewhat different perspective as a Boomer whose life was shaped by the Lutheran and Episcopal Church. Language can be a barrier to understanding and welcoming, which is how I interpret the whole point that Rev. Claassen is making. Here at Saint Mark’s Cathedral in Seattle our best-attended service is Compline, with hundreds of Millenials streaming in early to find a seat. They are struck by the beauty and emotional impact of the ancient liturgy, but if our “words of welcome and invitation” sound like some secret society, it’s a barrier to deeper engagement. I personally like the Latin terms that have been integrated into our vocabulary, but what’s so terrible about explaining what an uncommon word means when it’s used? This is “translation,” not dumbing down. So let’s celebrate our rich heritage and simultaneously make it simple for people to understand and engage with it. We’ll all reap the benefits. July 3, 2014 at 4:04 pm A correction to my comment above regarding Rowan Williams’ observation. As paraphrased by Benjamin Myers is: “….. God cannot be relied upon to work through the appropriate channels…” Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing September 10, 2014 at 12:58 pm Discipleship isn’t mentioned in the teaching series I grew up in…not one time is it mentioned in ‘any’ of the texts…kind of like the word Bishop isn’t found once in Elizabeth I’s thrity nine articles go figure…maybe because we’re in the church of Washington, Jay, Hamilton…for me the Scripture is the 1st source for discipleship as it tells all the God stories…2nd is our story (including women) as we now live in the time of the Holy Spirit (she)…in other words our story juxtaposed to Scripture is a very gradual self-formation, where ‘virtues’ are formed contextually within the circle of ones’ friends who share our ‘values’ wisdom and understanding.Some talk also needs to go forth comparing discipleship to cronyism…minus the $’s of course… July 3, 2014 at 1:17 pm Bingo! As a baby boomer, I could not more whole heartedly agree! As a church, we have tried for too long to “be” what we think others want us to be. Changing terminology to fit in, or to be cool to a group of people is just silly. Be who we are and be proud of it! Thank you, John. John McCann says: Timothy Fountain says: Danny L Anderson says: Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN July 3, 2014 at 1:57 pm Agreed! Agreed! As a baby boomer- and I REALLY dislike the way we use the media’s terminoligy to “typecast us”- I can move easily among age groups. Am fairly new to the Episcopal church (confirmed 3 years ago), but am in deep, deep , deep. My faith journey has taken me to places I didnt expect to go. My church (Trinity Wall Street), has a diverse congregation, many opportunities for the laity to particpate- as a lay liturgical minister, a missionary, a number of service programs, and study classes. We are very lucky to have two historic churches, that offer on Sundays, two services at St. Paul’s Chapel, and two services at Trinity Wall Street. We really reflect the “three legged stool” of Anglicanism: “faith, tradition and reason”. Although my paternal grandfather was a missionary in China from 1895 to 1940, I was a “miltary brat” and had the good fortune to grow up with a father who was born in Beijing, I was born in Tokyo, one brother born in Washington DC, and the other in Paris, France, I experienced a lot of moving, and different mainline churches, When the “Fundamentalists” and “Evangelicals” held sway for the past 30 years or so with their “culture wars” agenda- the Church didnt seem to have anything to do with the teachings of Jesus Christ. I sense that the Anglican churches, and Pope Francis, want to lead us back to the foundatinal teachings of Christ- which are so strongly based on feeding the hungry, housing the homeless, helping the poor and broken, and I think that “Faith in Action” DEFINITELY resonates with the younger generation, I find most kids today raised on ideas of community service- and agree whole heartedly that our traditions and rituals dont need to be changed- its our LIVING OUR FAITH- and yes, I was one, who, on a very cold day in New York, was dispensing Ashes on the Go, These types of ministries take the church outside the walls of the institutiion, straight to peoples lives, Thanks for your thoughtful posts, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 7, 2014 at 11:27 am Who says that we don’t mean the same thing today when we say the Nicene Creed? The bishops that wrote it weren’t fundamentalists. July 3, 2014 at 5:01 pm Any time one enters a new career field, or even moves across the country, there is a new vocabulary to master. I think much of our jargon conveys a mysterious beauty to what we do, think, and believe. That said, I personally try to limit the jargon until new converts have been given their decoder ring and secret handshake instructions. Anthony Parker says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Brad Howard says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Lionel Deimel says: Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 6, 2014 at 7:02 pm The Episcopal Church in Metro New York would work. But most New Yorkers would probably prefer Diocese. It’s not really that odd or off-putting. July 3, 2014 at 2:08 pm I don’t think the use of “diocese” represented an attempt to emphasize episcopal leadership. When our church was formed, we spoke of “states,” since states were co-terminal with our judicatories. We needed another term when it became clear that some judicatories were only parts of states, with other parts in other judicatories. Perhaps “the Episcopal Church in Connecticut” seems to work fine, but “the Episcopal Church in Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island in New York City, and the counties of Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster and Westchester” seems a bit less euphonious than “the Episcopal Diocese of New York.”Communicating in ways that will be understood by the intended audience is fine. Simplification, however, which is always a temptation, can result in reduced efficiency of communication within our faith community. Episcopalians have many special terms because we have many objects and activities that can be otherwise described only by long phrases. By Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 3, 2014 (The Rev. Canon) Thomas E. Winkler says: July 3, 2014 at 2:48 pm It seems to me that most organizations have a jargon or lingo that is peculiar to the organization. Boy Scouts and the Masons come immediately to mind. One becomes part of the organization, and acquires a sense of belonging, partly by learning the lingo. While the Episcopal Church has, perhaps, more jargon than most – and has my favorite in all the world, “Canon to the Ordinary” I don’t think we should give up any of them. We do need to do a much better job of telling the world who we are and what we do, but let’s keep the jargon. Much of it is charming; all of it is much more poetic and elegant than any of the substitutions I’ve heard. Most of those are pedantic and way too preachy. And, to be honest, our very name – Episcopal – is a word which most outsiders don’t understand and couldn’t spell! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Drew Downs says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 4, 2014 at 2:46 pm Couldn’t agree more with Jimmy Bartz. As a business traveler, one of the more depressing discoveries I make is to walk into an Episcopal church in some new town and find that they’re doing it straight by the Book. That tells me nothing — and a lot — about that congregation. They’d just as soon post a sign outside that says, “We don’t take risks.” That said, the Incarnation is, in my un-seminary-educated opinion, a key concept in the life that we call Christian — I believe — and if you can’t find a way to back your congregation into that central concept so that they can use the term “Incarnation” meaningfully, you chose the wrong business or the wrong seminary. July 3, 2014 at 2:47 pm What John Rovell says!To which I would add: obviously, we want to craft the wording of our materials to be appropriate to its intended audience, but that does not mean that we throw away Episcopal terms. We shouldn’t dummy down, there’s enough of that everywhere in our culture. Instead, we should educate; that’s what people are seeking. I really can’t stand linguistic politics for many reasons, but on the most fundamental level I am opposed to fiddling with language because it exhausts energy on changing the words people use rather than addressing the realities those words represent. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 4, 2014 at 1:53 pm There’s value in the exercise of trying to put our belief and practice into words that we can express to non-Christians. But as people go deeper in faith, it inevitably involves new fluency in thoughts, terms and practices that were at one time alien to the person. So I suppose I’m saying there’s some “both/and” to this – creating open doors for those who might explore our faith and also digging deeper pools for those who continue in discipleship.Another cultural aspect in play is the increased diversity in which we live. At one time, almost everybody in America spoke some “Christian.” Just look at political speeches up until just a generation or two ago. That’s no longer the case. So it is like we need an out of church language and an in church language, unified, as several are saying in the comments above, but a lifestyle that makes sense of the words we use. July 3, 2014 at 4:56 pm I echo so many of the points made in the comments above, and will add a few more. 1) Beauty (as in “the beauty of holiness”) is a spiritual quality and a theological virtue (though not as classicaly defined). It was part of our founding gift and identity with Cramner’s use of language in the 16th century. It was also very much a part of the mission of the Oxford Movement in the 19th and early 20th centuries – particularly in poor urban areas. We still need true beauty today as a counter-weight to the shallowness and downright tawdriness of much popular culture. And by beauty I do not mean that we should be stuck in any one musical or artistic style or time period. 2) The only reason, I think, that we assume that that people walking into our services should feel immediately “comfortable” (whatever that means) is the holdover from thinking that we are a Christian nation, we we are not. We are a country where the majority of people have historically claimed an affiliation with the Church; those are not the same thing. And why should we feel “comfortable” with God? As C.S. Lewis said (and the vast majority of the Bible makes clear) “Aslan is not a tame lion.” Do we really want to worship a tame, domesticated God? 3) Other faith traditions (some Christian, some not) have no expectation that a visitor or newcomer will have any facility with their beleifs or worship. Instead they say, in effect, “You are welcome here. Watch, learn, try it out, watch what we do, ask questions. Be patient. Eventually you will learn our ways and our life.” 4) Every summer I serve as a chaplain for a summer music course (one of about a dozen each year) where we have 100 kids, plus college students and 20/30s adults come for an intensive week of choral music, worship and fun – full choral Evensong every night. This is the highlight of the year for most of these kids, not just musically, but spiritually. Granted, this is not everyone’s interest, but there are certainly many kids and young adults in parishes throughout the country that find the Anglican tradition of worship to be life-giving. 5) Final thought – a Vestry member said at a recent meeting: “We shouldn’t try to be everything to everyone.” So, be who we are, each in the different neighborhoods and communites where Christ has planted us, and be open to the way the Holy Spirit leads us to serve those around us, as we are fed and inspired in our worship to do. And quit worrying about the outcome. Peter Stuart says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Nick Cuccia says: July 3, 2014 at 10:34 pm I am pleasantly surprised at the overall positions of the respondents. And I support them. John Mack says: July 3, 2014 at 3:58 pm Where’s Arvella Schuller when you need her to further dumb down the hymns. No doubt she could really eviscerate Rite I. I don’t want to be part of a church that’s trendy. It was the beauty of the liturgy that first few me to the Episcopal church 50 years ago and has sustained me, and still inspires and uplifts me. . And fortunately much of it still remains in a few places. Prof. John Switzer says: John Rovell says: Susan Zimmerman says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 6, 2014 at 7:05 pm Praying community is OK. But it really should be something like “a community praying as Jesus taught us, and practicing respect for and love of neighbor, as Jesus taught us. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Dennis Whittington says: Alda Morgan says: Richard A. Bamforth says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR July 5, 2014 at 10:35 am With the Episcopal Church, USA shrinking in numbers it would seem that in order to communicate with the Un-churched and Non-Episcopalians a show of Hospitality would be to use terminology that is more likely to be understood . When I speak with my non-Episcopalian friends I refer to our “Senior Pastor”, not Rector, and I would refer “Communion” not the “Eucharist” as an example. There is plenty of time for a new Episcopalian to learn our traditions and terminology , once they decide to try our church, but how many will want to try our church if we overwhelm them with our own “Episcopaleze” language before they have even visited the Episcopal church . My opinion is that in order to even get non-Episcopalians to try the Episcopal Church, we need to speak to them in language that they understand . How newcomer and visitor friendly are our individual congregation websites, literature, worship bulletins , etc ? John B Hills says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Doug Desper says: center_img July 5, 2014 at 11:42 am The Church – (insert denomination here) – has increasingly tried since the 1960s to be relevant to people of the Western consumer, loose loyalties culture. Oddly, the trend in nearly every denomination was and still is one of a nose dive in numbers. Clown Masses, Guitar Masses, Halloween Costume Masses, Plain Clothes Masses, Tent Masses, Change the Communion Element Masses…ad nauseum. Note, that we are dealing mainly with a gratification, short-attention culture who addresses life by asking all the wrong questions of nearly everything; that is, “what’s in it for me?” and “what’s else do you have?”. So, the Church starts to act up to try to maintain the attention of that mind and quite often veils the response as “The Gospel”. Somehow, I don’t think that “being relevant” to that mindset has ever worked, and certainly not in the past 50 years. Gratification and loose loyalty orientaton needs to be challenged and re-shaped. Kinda like Jesus did some time ago. I think his invitation was “come and die”. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Scott Claassen of thads describes himself as “a Monday through Saturday follower of Jesus who worships on Sunday.”He believes it conveys a clearer understanding of what his faith means to him than “Episcopalian” or even “Christian”.“The main point is, it inverts our sense of discipleship from saying being a disciple means I go to church on Sunday,” Claassen, 35, told ENS recently. “Instead it says being a disciple means I practice this Jesus way throughout all of my life and I happen to get together with a bunch of other people on Sunday who do that, too.”Call it semantics, but Claassen isn’t alone. Increasingly, individuals, congregations and even dioceses across the Episcopal Church are shifting language subtly – and not so subtly – to clarify identity and meaning and to make cultural and contextual connections.Churches and congregations are becoming known as “communities of faith” and “centers of mission” and the word diocese has been dropped in favor of “The Episcopal Church in” places like Minnesota and Connecticut.None of which is meant as “a strategy to get people to come to church, it’s just who we are at the core,” according to the Rev. Jimmy Bartz. He founded thads eight years ago as an “experimental community, or in church-speak, a mission station” of the Diocese of Los Angeles, he said.“We’re about spreading love and making a difference wherever we are because that’s what Jesus was about and we’re committed to doing it together,” Bartz said. “It’s like that old country song, ‘be real baby, be real.’”Becoming tradition ‘translators’Helping the uninitiated navigate insider church-speak, complex liturgies and specific Episcopalianisms often involves becoming “translators, of sorts,” according to Bartz and others.“It comes from this great gift that’s been afforded by learning the language of the Episcopal Church and its liturgy and tradition and wanting the culture to understand those gifts but having some sense that it’s too great of an expectation for me to demand that the culture learn the language that I’ve learned,” Bartz said.The Rev. Becky Zartman, when reaching out to the largely millennial population in Washington, D.C.’s Dupont Circle neighborhood, talks “about networks, about groups of people in relationship with each other who love each other and who are trying to be faithful Christians together.“That’s what I think of when I think of church. But some people think of it as a building or an institution or cathedral or something you only do on Sunday morning,” said Zartman, 29, assistant rector at St. Thomas, Dupont Circle, who blogs as the Vicar of H Street.And when she blogs, “if I ever use a church word I define it or explain what it means. Better yet, I don’t use it. I might write an entire reflection on the Incarnation and never use the word. People either don’t know what it means or think they do and they don’t.”And much of the time, “I’m starting in the negative,” she adds. “Because people have a negative connotation of the church or think that Christians are stupid. The problem is, church is such an umbrella term.“In talking to millennials who have no positive experience with the institutional church, I’m still trying to figure out how do I explain this thing that we’re doing. I’m trying to be accessible, but to go deeper at the same time.”St. Thomas’ vestry member Catherine Manhardt agreed.“We have this really amazing church and liturgy and worship and common prayer and it’s central to who we are, once we get there,” she said. “But when you say I’m Episcopalian because the Eucharist is really important to me, that’s not going to resonate with people, and you want people to understand what you’re talking about.”Rather than telling friends she serves on the vestry, “I say board of directors,” adds Manhardt, 25. Evangelism becomes “community engagement.“For me, the most important part about church is the community … I don’t want to make who we are a barrier to the kind of people who could become part of our community.”‘Communities of faith becoming centers of mission’Through the New Visions Initiative (NVI) which partners thriving historically African American congregations with struggling ones, the Rev. Angela Ifill, the Episcopal Church’s missioner for black ministries, has witnessed language shifts re-energize congregations.“Language plays a huge part in the way parishioners think of themselves,” Ifill said in a recent e-mail to ENS.Her invitation to a New Visions group “to think of themselves as communities of faith becoming centers of mission, brought the question, ‘You mean we have to be doing something?’” she recalled. “It was a break-through in better understanding their purpose for being.”Similarly, “praying communities” and “Episcopal presences” are the way Bishop David Rice describes “who we are, by talking about what we do … because the reality for me is that the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin is a praying community and within that are many praying communities,” he said.“The primary intent is Luke 10, being sent out, hearing the stories of people, responding to needs, and building relationships, but not as a roundabout way of ensuring that we get people into church.”Since his March 2014 election, “the typical question I ask everywhere is, ‘what does an Episcopal presence look like in this context? What do people say about the Episcopal Church where they are” including those who don’t attend church, he said.Bishops Ian Douglas of Connecticut and Brian Prior of Minnesota each recognized a name change was in order when they realized the word “diocese” conveyed images of buildings and bishops rather than a sense of community, inclusion, and corporate identity.A recent shift to “the Episcopal Church in Connecticut” actually reclaims tradition and common identity, Douglas said. “It was the original name of who we were when Samuel Seabury, the first bishop in the Episcopal Church, signed the Concordat with the three nonjuring bishops in the Episcopal Church of Scotland in 1784,” Douglas said.The word “diocese” came along in the late 1830s and became associated with the bishop’s office and staff rather than “the united witness of the 168 parishes and worshiping communities participating in the mission of God together,” he said.A move to a new, flexible shared workspace with an open floor plan accompanied the name change. It’s known as the Commons of the Episcopal Church in Connecticut, echoing the New England metaphor of the village green as a center of activity. Initial feedback has been extremely positive, Douglas said.Similarly, “the Episcopal Church in Minnesota” conveys the reality “that our faith communities come in all sizes and shapes and contexts” including churches, senior housing, schools, campus ministries and other agencies who worship corporately, according to Bishop Brian Prior.Yet, “we’re really clear in our language and in the big picture that the Episcopal Church in Minnesota (ECIM) is a diocese of The Episcopal Church; there’s never been a question about that.”Language shifts prompted structural changes, he said. “I joke that there is no bishop’s staff here,” Prior says. “The only staff I have is the one I carry in procession.”The diocese consists of “mission areas”, invited “to get clear about their identity and context, about what God’s up to in their neighborhood and to find a sustainable model for living into God’s mission in their context.”As a result, Prior said. “More Minnesota Episcopalians know about the world’s needs and how to bring their gifts to meet the world’s needs to engage God’s mission” on local and individual levels, rather than trying “to get everybody into church.”He hopes to revise parochial reports to measure, in addition to budgets and average Sunday attendance (ASA), levels of community impact.For example, “there’s a faith community here with an ASA of 19 who feeds a hundred people every Friday. They have a huge impact on their community. That’s vibrancy. That’s really engaging in God’s mission, and that’s of more interest to us.”‘No one-size-fits-all’Language shifts notwithstanding, no one-size-fits-all; Episcopal identity still encompasses a wide spectrum, from evangelicals to Anglo-Catholics, say Prior and others.Personally, says Bartz, “it drives me crazy that I hear from Episcopalians all the time, that ‘I can go anywhere in the country and get the same thing in church,’” he said.“I think that’s a devastating indictment about how shallow our church has become, that we really don’t expect anything from people other than the execution of a particular liturgy in a particular way on Sunday morning. I understand it, but it drives me crazy.”But for Broderick Greer, 24, a former Missionary Baptist and current Virginia Theological Seminary student, the liturgy’s poetic language was a way into the church. “I had run out of words in my personal prayer life and the church was able to say words it had been saying for centuries that I just couldn’t find for myself.”Consistently asking the questions of faith – as individuals, as churches, as dioceses – is a given, and the challenge of inaccessible language can be overcome by the church “educating its people and those outside it,” he said.“We say the Nicene Creed every week but we know that it doesn’t mean the same thing to us as to the people who wrote it. And so that’s why there is value in saying the same words that people have always said but knowing that those words are not static. They are living and offer life and new meaning for us and part of the task of the church is constantly interpreting what these words mean.”About 40 Twitter followers responded to his recent tweet ‘what first drew you to the Episcopal Church?’ which he compiled into a Storify. For many, liturgy and language were the attractions.“I thought to myself … why are we not tapping into this gift we have and sharing it with the world?” Greer said. “We think it’s so great and yet we don’t tell anyone about it and don’t tell anyone about the Christ we encounter in it.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Comments navigation Newer comments July 5, 2014 at 10:21 am Being hip is not necessarily good communication. Note the Bible translations that tried to be hip and now read as something that was trendy & has passed its prime. Such translations have their use, but for the long haul, good standard English stands longer. The medical profession uses specific language so they can talk about exact specific conditions, where it is, and what is it’s expected out come. Computer programers use another language, Chiefs another, those who repair cars another. If your serious about a subject, yes even following Jesus, there is a language used. I do not feel the Church needs to dump everything, rather it needs to educate (that was the original purpose of Sunday school). Also, there is nothing wrong in having a short teaching session incorporated into the Sunday service; call it the children’s sermon, but speak loud enough so all can hear. Define “churchy” words in a story context, Or clarify the meaning behind some of the prayers in the BCP, etc. Gee, sounds like something I’d like to do!!! Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (40) Janet M. Diehl says: Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA July 3, 2014 at 2:24 pm I agree wholeheartedly with Mr. Greer, and with Mr. Parker. Very, very thoughtful words, and encouraging. Harry w Shipps says: Hughhansen says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 3, 2014 at 9:37 am Where to begin? Changing language and replacing traditional names isn’t going to fool millenials like myself. Rachel Held Evans did an entire article about this kind of thing recently. Millenials can sniff out bs and illegitness from miles away. Mr. Greer, the seminarian reflected more truly where our generation is. We have been raised in an age where our faith has been Hillsong-ized. There are plenty of post-modern “worship centers” filled with people “really into the whole Jesus thing”. Many of us are beginning to see that as completely insincere. The Episcopal Church has an amazing gift in it’s ancient liturgy and traditions. Drawing people, especially those in the 18-35 year old range is going to involve SHOWING people who we are and what we offer, not telling them. The Evangelical Movement tried to erase our church’s contributions to Christianity in this country, and it is time we reverse this. However, re-introducing ourselves means being our legit selves. We need to keep our ancient rituals and liturgy but radically insert them into new situations. An excellent example of this is the “Ashes to Go” programs many churches have on Ash Wednesday. Changing our vocabulary won’t fool anyone, they’ll just see us as phonies or as ashamed of our past. We must bring our traditions to the outside world in a tangible way and not be afraid to say “I am Episcopalian” with all that entails. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments navigation Newer comments July 3, 2014 at 3:21 pm I say a devout “AMEN!” to all who have responded. My heart sank as I read the ENS article. Here we go again, was my weary thought, trying to be trendy and “cool” and “in touch” with “today’s world”. I’m immensely grateful that all the responders love and appreciate the richness of the Anglican heritage and are willing to say so. And I’m especially grateful—no, thankful–to those who remind us that we need to do a better job of educating ourselves and inquirers. Bravo! Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest July 3, 2014 at 1:33 pm I hope we’re listening to actual young voices like these! Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ July 3, 2014 at 3:31 pm I like the informed discussion, all the comments. They speak not only of maintaining the spiritual sense in our traditions and especially our orthodoxy in doctrine taken from faith tradition and reason, and also of a “doing” religion, like feeding and clothing the needy, which implies compassion, being able to go around policy if necessary to administer services to those who are in need. They do not imply at the church should not move bravely into the future. To accomplish the work of the Church we may have to at times recognize Rowan Williams’ observation that God does not always follow the chain of command. So, change our approach without changing our identity in the Christian faith. As for speaking clearly, the clearest message we can speak is that of love and mercy and reaching out to other people. That can embody modern languages and modern thought without changing the BCP or the essential traditional structures of the church. I too am a recently confirmed Episcopalian. How would I ever do without the biblically-centered liturgy of the Word, the sermon,the music, and especially the Eucharist? Do we not want a distinctive symbol in our communities that does not look like every other structure, and form of worship that does not look like every other meeting in a pluralistic, postmodern society? Are any of those forms of worship that difficult to comprehend? Surely, it is not implied here that we need a more entertaining atmosphere? I feel that I have found a gem in a field, and I have attempted to buy the field, lest I lose the gem. Are attempts underway to abscond with the gem and leave me impoverished? I hope not. I hope we will simply use the tools that God has placed in our hands to exemplify the body of Christ in our diocese. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 22, 2014 at 5:09 pm I hope we can learn something from these alternative forms. It will take some time to see what that might be. It’s one of the things I’ve always loved about our church.The concern I find myself with is what appears to be a blindside in the ENS reporting. This form is offered as voice of the millennials when in fact there are probably more people of that generation attending fairly traditional Episcopal Churches, especially those with some sensitivity to the ancient -future approach. Take a look at St. Paul’s Seattle for example — http://www.stpaulseattle.org/ and http://www.congregationaldevelopment.com/means-of-grace-hope-of-glory/2013/4/22/worship-that-swept-us-off-our-feet-saint-pauls-seattle.html Vicki McGrath says: July 3, 2014 at 9:00 pm Scott Claassen has instigated a much needed dialogue in this ENS report. The multiple responses indicate its significance and I am grateful for their diversity. It all takes me back to the best years of Episcopal Life magazine when Nan Cobbey was Features Editor. Provocative articles brought forth numerous responses with very divergent opinions. Some may remember the article I wrote in those days in which I called for translation of some of our beloved liturgical language. I had the presumption of suggesting we replace archaic subjunctive forms that come across as vague and tentative to more declarative and kerygmatic ones that sound more celebratory. Try saying, for example, “The Lord is with you!” and “The peace of the Lord is always with you!” and “Almighty God has mercy on you, forgives all your sins ,etc.” Also, “Thank you, God!’ and “The peace of he Lord is always with you!” and “We praise you, Lord Christ!” If we indeed believe in such Good News, why should we be afraid of proclamation? Responses to my article ranged from grateful Hurrays to scandalized embarrassment. I hope the approaches of Claassen and the thads will continue to make comfortable Episcopalians squirm and open doors to those who can’t comprehend our lingo. July 3, 2014 at 1:53 pm Does the Rev’d Scott Claassen really think Jesus described himself other than as a Jew, or dispensed with his ancient religion’s terminology?? Today, our Orthodox Church friends, who are growing everywhere they are found, laugh at us as we try to make everything immediately accessible and immediately comprehensible to newcomers and inquirers. I have never even seen what we would call a proper service leaflet at an Orthodox service! Many of their theologians compare us to the rocky soil of Matthew’s parable: quick immediate results, but no depth, root, or staying power. One Orthodox laymen told me years ago, when our ring-binder altar service book was published by Church Publishing, that at least now our service book matched our theology. Our obsession with the immediate, so profoundly immature, seems unable to use or appreciate the depth of 2000 years of shared Christian experience and insight. When will we learn that while His yoke may be easy and his burthen light, following Jesus requires the depth and humility of a daily cross? When will we learn that centuries of reflection upon what that means enables us to do it more fully and richly? People like Mr Greer are our Church’s hope, as they discover what distinctive gifts we have to offer out of our wide and ancient English-flavored experience, taking from our store things both new and very old indeed. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Robert Gallagher, OA says: Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Chris Epting says: July 3, 2014 at 3:58 pm A very, very long article to read….especially at 4:00 PM on July 3…..is this “church jargon”?Is Pat McCaughan aware that the Rev. Scott Claassen’s quotation which begins this article…as printed….seems to suggest that Jesus is the one who worships on Sunday, not necessarily the Reverend Mr. Claassen? John McCann says: Dustin Henderson says: Hughhansen says: John Neitzel says: July 3, 2014 at 11:02 pm Despite the title, the article itself is focused on communicating the depth and breadth of our tradition, recognizing how much insider jargon gets in the way, given (my two cents) that we can no longer expect the same common background that we expected a generation ago. The article’s focus is communication, not trend-chasing and teaching, rather than blowing smoke. Also, given the level of commitment the above commentors have to the theology, tradition, and polity of our church, I’d like to point out that virtually nothing I’ve read has actually conflicted with the presented substance of the article. As Phyllis Tickle reminds us, we usually only refer to things as “traditional” which are less than a century old. There are many ancient and historic practices in our own tradition worth reclaiming that transcend the current and previous Prayer Books.The worship I experience in many of our churches has matched the most common word I hear from Episcopalians about worship: comfortable. It feels to me that our attachment to who and what we are now is much less like love and adoration for the ancient patterns of our liturgy and more like idolatry of particular wordings of that liturgy. This is proven every time we try to sing a hymn that is not one of the 30 favorites: more people complain about familiarity than say “oh, what beauty! Thank God we have 700 more like this one!” Pardon my own moment of snark, but my life in our church taught me that most of my elders had their primary (and final) formation in a confirmation class consisting of 12 year-olds memorizing the names of our sacred dishes rather than helping develop a life-long pattern of worshiping, seeking, and serving. And more, preparing our parents to pass on such a tradition to their/our children. I see this as the reason we’re even having this conversation: we have struggled for the last 50 years with passing on both the practices of our tradition and their purpose. We’re left with a faith and tradition we’re struggling to communicate and world less prepared to receive it. Like my Calculus professor who refused to teach the class a different way when none of us could follow him, we seem more inclined to teach the students we don’t have rather than the ones we do. Gerald Pemberton says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 John Mack says: Press Release Service Rich McDonough says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bob Chapman says: July 5, 2014 at 3:31 pm AMEN ! One of the reasons I came to The Episcopal Church at 16 years old , 30 now and still love it . Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 7, 2014 at 3:44 pm Dennis, the problem with this is that most young people aren’t really going to have any associations, and certainly not positive associations, with words like “Senior Pastor” or “Communion” either. If you’re going down that road, I’d actually argue that words like “rector” and “Eucharist” have a neutral association since they ARE unfamiliar, and “pastor” and “communion” have a negative association since those words are more familiar from Evangelical and popular depictions of Christians. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

Northern Indiana: Bishop Ed Little will resign in 2016

first_img Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Bishop Edward S. Little II[Episcopal News Service] Diocese of Northern Indiana Bishop Edward S. Little II recently announced the he will resign at the end of June 2016.Little, 68, was ordained and consecrated in March 2000 as the diocese’s seventh bishop.He included the following letter in the April edition of the “Around the Diocese” newsletter.Dear brothers and sisters,This past Tuesday I presented a letter to the Standing Committee, announcing my retirement as of June 30, 2016. At the time, I will have served as bishop of this wonderful diocese for 16 years. My ministry as your bishop, however, will actually conclude three months earlier – March 31, 2016 – when I begin a three-month sabbatical to write a long-planned book.Palm Sunday marks the first day of a new visitation cycle. In my closing cycle, I will have the  opportunity to visit all 36 churches of our diocese and to thank you for your witness to Jesus, for your faithfulness in mission and ministry, and for your kindness and encouragement to Sylvia and to me.I have said many times and in many settings that if I had the opportunity to choose any diocese in the Episcopal Church to serve as bishop, I would without hesitation select Northern Indiana. Our diocese is a profoundly Christ-centered community, a place where Jesus is known, loved, worshiped, and followed. Our relationships are deep. Indeed, the small size of our diocese is a blessing, because it has given me the gift of knowing people and parishes in a way that my colleague bishops envy. March 18, 2000, the day of my consecration in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on the campus of Notre Dame, marked a turning point in my life for which I will always give thanks. You have touched Sylvia’s life and mine, welcomed us into your hearts, and drawn us ever more deeply into the heart of Jesus himself.Sunday is the high point of my week. Worshiping with you, hearing the Word and sharing the Eucharist, and seeing Jesus at work in a glorious variety of ways have planted memories that I will forever cherish. I offer thanks to God for the gift of walking with you as fellow disciples, and am humbled by the expressions of love and support that Sylvia and I have received during a decade and a half of ministry in Northern Indiana.In the coming months, I ask for your prayers for the Standing Committee, under the leadership of its president, Fr. Matthew Cowden. Their task is to discern the next steps for the diocese and to oversee the process of electing the 8th Bishop of Northern Indiana. This challenging and exciting work will be an opportunity for the entire diocese to walk in faith into the future that God has planned.St. Paul’s words seem especially apt, and express something of what I feel as I write this letter: “I thank my God every time I remember you. In all my prayers for all of you, I always pray with joy, because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now, being confident of this, that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus” (Philippians 1:3-5).I lean on St. Paul’s words because I am overwhelmed with gratitude, beyond my ability fully to articulate, for the privilege of serving as Bishop of Northern Indiana. With love and blessings I amYours in Christ,+Ed In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY House of Bishops, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Elections, Rector Albany, NY Northern Indiana: Bishop Ed Little will resign in 2016 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN People Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Posted Mar 27, 2015 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

El ministerio de reasentamiento de Atlanta: una fiesta en Navidad…

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY El ministerio de reasentamiento de Atlanta: una fiesta en Navidad y una amistad durante todo el año In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Este artículo es parte de una serie en desarrollo que explora la respuesta de parte de la Iglesia Episcopal y de sus asociados ecuménicos a la crisis global de los refugiados. Otros artículos de la serie se pueden encontrarse aquí.[Episcopal News Service] Puede ser la primera fiesta de Navidad para cerca de 40 niños de familias refugiadas —y Steve Heckler, voluntario de la iglesia de Todos los Santos [All Saints Church] está desbordante de entusiasmo, ansioso de presentarle a un niño congolés de 6 años una equipo para armar autos de juguete.“Él quería autos de juguete y encontré este ingenioso juego que tiene todas las piezas y puedes armar varios autos diferentes enseguida e intercambiarlos” y Heckler dijo que él andará cerca de lo largo del año para ayudar a ensamblarlos si hace falta.La fiesta del 19 de diciembre es un evento anual organizado por el ministerio de reasentamiento de refugiados de la iglesia de Todos los Santos, asociada con New American Pathways, la filial del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración en Atlanta.“Recaudamos varios miles de dólares en tarjetas de alimentos y tarjetas de Wal-Mart, y hacemos unos 500 regalos para las tres diferentes organizaciones”, dijo Louisa Merchant, directora del ministerio de reasentamiento de refugiados en Todos los Santos.Leapin’ Lizards y relaciones transformadorasHeckler dijo recientemente a Episcopal Church Service que él probablemente derive tanto placer de participar en la fiesta de Navidad de Todos los Santos como los niños mismos.“Es realmente maravilloso, vamos a llevarles a Leapin’ Lizards – uno de esos lugares de recreaciones infantiles. Fijamos un límite de $40 por niño y usualmente sabemos lo que el niño va a pedir. Los voluntarios de la iglesia consiguen el regalo lo envuelven e incluyen una nota personal”.Los regalos no se entregan hasta el final de la fiesta. Primero, hay pizza y diversión. Es un acontecimiento al que él lleva a sus propias hijas, de 8 y 10 años, que también se han amistado con la familia a la que ayuda como voluntario.“Me he relacionado más con una madre afgana y sus hijas. La madre vino sabiendo bastante inglés debido al trabajo que ella realizaba en Afganistán.“Ella voló de Kabul, pernoctó en Dubái, luego siguió a Nueva York donde durmió y finalmente vino a Atlanta, donde fue recibida [con sus hijas] por voluntarios que las llevaron a un apartamento que les habíamos amueblado agradablemente”, recordaba él.“Ella decía que estaba tan asustada y tan preocupada hasta que entró y vio lo bonito que era el apartamento que le habíamos preparado. Dijo que entonces supo que las personas se habían ocupado en verdad de ellas y que eso marcaba la diferencia”.Más de dos décadas de exitosos reasentamientos.Por más de veinte años, el ministerio de reasentamiento de refugiados de la Iglesia ha ayudado a copatrocinar familias provenientes de Bosnia, Vietnam, Sudán, Somalia, la República Democrática del Congo, Ruanda, Afganistán, Birmania y Bután, según la directora Louisa Merchant.El Dr. Heval Mohamed Kelli, de 32 años, recuerda lo que la tutoría y otros ministerios de Todos los Santos significó para él y su familia después de su llegada a Estados Unidos, vía Alemania, dos semanas después del 11 de septiembre de 2001.“Somos refugiados sirios, somos curdos. Mi papá tuvo que dejar el país en 1996 debido a la opresión política”, le dijo él a ENS. “Inicialmente fuimos a Alemania, pero nunca nos dieron la residencia permanente, de manera que no podía asistir a la universidad allí”.Él tenía 17 años, la familia se reasentó en Atlanta, y “en el transcurso de la primera semana, miembros de Todos los Santos se aparecieron para darnos la bienvenida”.En Todos los Santos un voluntario fue su instructor de inglés durante un año entero. Otro, un hombre de 80 años, le enseñó como solicitar su ingreso en la universidad., Su padre se enfermó a poco de ellos llegar; su madre no podía encontrar trabajo y su hermano era demasiado joven para trabajar, de manera que Kelli consiguió un empleo lavando platos.Después que él y su hermano compartieron sus problemas, miembros anónimos de la iglesia pagaron el alquiler de la familia durante seis meses, les ayudaron a conseguir un auto y les pagaron a los hermanos para podar sus céspedes y cuidar a sus niños.Ahora, Kelli, que se hizo ciudadano en 2006, se está preparando para ser cardiólogo y su hermano se prepara para ser cirujano. Kelli trabaja de voluntario en un clínica gratuita a pocas cuadras de la primera vivienda de su familia, y recientemente le otorgaron una beca de cardiología de cuatro años en la Universidad de Emory, y apareció en un artículo de la Associated Press que se publicó en el New York Times y en otros medios.“Todo eso es posible debido a la iniciativa de Todos los Santos de ayudarnos a integrarnos en la sociedad norteamericana. Y todo ello fue muy aleccionador, porque no somos cristianos. Somos musulmanes”, dijo.“Todos los Santos es un ejemplo ilustrativo de invertir en el futuro de las personas. Creyeron en mi familia y nos ayudaron como seres humanos, independientemente del trasfondo religioso. Hicieron una inversión decisiva en mi familia y nos hicieron sentir como parte de este país desde el primer día. Eso es lo más importante para todo refugiado e inmigrante”.Vivir el Evangelio: ayudar a los refugiados ‘un buen punto de partida’El 20 de diciembre, la congregación conocerá a la familia más reciente —una pareja con tres hijos varones, de 9 y 2 años y 9 meses— que llegó de Birmania a mediados de octubre.La congregación ayuda a amueblar y a aprovisionar un apartamento de comida, lleva a las familias al médico y a otras citas, les ayuda a aprender inglés y les proporciona otra asistencia durante el período de ajuste de los primeros tres meses, pero “tendemos a mantener nuestra relación con las familias” más allá de eso, dijo Merchant, quien agrega que participar en este ministerio “es vivir los principios fundamentales del Evangelio, vivir conforme a la dirección de Cristo.“Todos los pobres sufren discriminación, y todos los pobres enfrentan opresión estructural de una variedad de maneras y experimentan aislamiento de muchas formas, pero la comunidad refugiada tiene la diferencia añadida de las barreras idiomáticas y culturales, además del trauma debido a ser supervivientes de una guerra”, afirmó Merchant.“Cualquiera que tenga que tratar con sistemas burocráticos sufre opresión. Cuando a eso le añades la abrupta enormidad de los obstáculos de la comunicación y la comprensión, más el hecho de que tú y tus hijos han perdido todo lo que tenían y todas tus conexiones con familia y amigos, debido a guerras de las cuales con frecuencia tenemos alguna responsabilidad en Estados Unidos… si eres una Iglesia que cree en combatir y luchar hasta el fin las causas de la guerra, luego el trabajar con refugiados es un buen punto de partida”.Heckler dijo que su participación como tutor transformó su vida de estar centrada “en el logro personal y en ganar dinero… en subir, subir y nunca sentir que era suficiente—al sentimiento de ahora de que mi vida está llena hasta desbordarse”.Presenciar el cambio provoca la transformación personal“Eres responsable de hacer cosas para ayudar y ver el impacto que eso tiene. Alguien obtuvo exitosamente una licencia de conducir. Una muchacha que vino a EE.UU. con un nivel de matemática de segundo grado, aprueba dos grados por encima de donde se encontraba.“Había sido víctima de abusos … le decían que era estúpida y la hacían sentarse en un rincón. Era miembro de una minoría étnica y la menospreciaban por eso, pero cuando ella se dio cuenta de que podía hacerlo, que podía vencer las matemáticas… ver eso significó mucho más para mí que cualquier cosa que jamás hubiera comprado”.Antes de su experiencia de voluntario, Heckler dijo que le preocupaban cosas como “una abolladura en el auto, una factura inesperada, una mancha en una prenda de ropa”.Pero ahora, “esas cosas se han desvanecido. Lo que también te das cuenta es de que has sido afortunado de vivir una vida donde sientes que has visto el amor de Dios operando en tu vida. Te das cuenta que lo que más Dios quiere que todos nosotros hagamos es compartir ese amor con otras personas”.La Navidad es una tiempo especialmente significativo para considerar participar, añadió. “Según meditamos en nuevos comienzos y en la llegada de Jesús y el supremo sacrificio de Jesús por nosotros, parece muy pequeño mostrar nuestra gratitud sacrificando algo de nuestro tiempo por ayudar a otros”.El Rev. Geoffrey Hoare, rector de Todos los Santos, dijo que si bien la fiesta de Navidad compromete a la parroquia y ofrece oportunidades “de dar de una manera que es específica y significativa… el objetivo del ministerio es realmente la conexión y la amistad, basadas en lo que los refugiados necesitan más que cualquier otra cosa. Buscamos ofrecer —además de las cosas regulares del reasentamiento— amistad”.Esperamos que la fiesta ayudará a crear conciencia de la difícil situación de los refugiados. “Ser extranjero en una tierra extraña tiene una gran resonancia para mí y para las personas aquí y estoy seguro que uno puede relacionar eso con la sagrada familia en la huida a Egipto”, dijo.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan es una corresponsal de Episcopal News Service que reside en Los Ángeles. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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