first_img $999 reading • CES 2019 TV roundup: Huge 8K screens and insane roll-up OLEDs Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? See It Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors 61 Photos Tags CES Products LG Samsung Sony Vizio Apple CES is a show first and foremost, meaning it’s not necessarily the best place to get a real sense of the actual televisions people are going to buy this year.Instead, it’s the place where manufacturers try to outdo each other with extreme displays that draw oohs and ahhs from attendees and fawning headlines from journalists. The TVs shown at CES 2019 were bigger and more innovative than ever, but the most notable are likely to be expensive.  CES 2019 Comments 11 Photos See All Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR TVs Best Buy See It Behold the majesty of LG’s OLED waterfall at CES 2019 Sprint See It This story was first published Thursday Jan. 10 at 4am PT.CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. center_img 5 roll-up OLED TVs at LG’s #CES2019 booth. Mesmerizing. pic.twitter.com/0k56LVuABb— David Katzmaier (@dkatzmaier) January 8, 2019 Share your voice Apple Apple iPhone XS See it Now playing: Watch this: Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it The best TVs of CES 2019 Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Boost Mobile 3 $999 • $999 Roll-up OLED is real, and it will hurt your bankrollMy favorite TV at the show, hands down, was the modestly sized 65-inch rollable OLED from LG. Seeing it in action, disappearing into its stand and reappearing to create a high-performance TV, is the stuff of CES legends. I also like the roll-up TV because it’s practical. A screen that can disappear when not in use frees up wall space and improves room decor by hiding a large black rectangle that’s otherwise kind of an eyesore when turned off. If your family wants to limit screen time, it’s nice to have that looming temptation simply go away during off hours.The 2019 version will cost a bundle — LG hasn’t hinted at a price but my guess is at least $10,000, roughly four times the cost of a standard 65-inch OLED — but in the next few years it could come down fast if LG wants to gain yet another advantage over competing, stiff and flat LCD-based TVs. Sony’s 85-inch and 98-inch 8K TVs are huge and sure to cost five figures. Sarah Tew/CNET 8K TVs: Strictly for profligate wastrels in 20192019 is the year of 8K. Here’s the major 8K-resolution TVs announced at the show and shipping in 2019:Samsung 65-, 75, 82- and 98-inch Q900A LCDSony 85- and 98-inch LCDLG 88-inch OLED and 75-inch LCDTCL 8K Roku TV (size not announced)Samsung’s models, aside from the 98-incher, are available for pre-order now. The 65-inch costs $5,000, the 75-inch $7,000 and the 82-inch $10,000. Bigger 8K sets are even more ridiculously expensive. Samsung’s current 85-inch model is $15,000 and I’d be surprised if that price fell much in 2019. As for 98-inch sets? The closest real-world equivalent is Sony’s 100-inch Z9D 4K TV, which cost $60,000 when it came out in 2016. That price sounds about right for the 98-inch 8K models.Beyond price, there’s the fact that 8K content is nonexistent and the improvements in image quality over 4K look to be slight, at best — hey, at least LG, Sony and Samsung confirmed 48 Gbps HDMI 2.1. This year, 8K is a plaything of the frivolous rich. 05-samsung-micro-led-the-wall-ces-2019 Sarah Tew/CNET Cool new tech: 2 LCDs, 4K lasers, 75-inch MicroLED8K resolution is the major current trend of the show, but looking ahead a bit, but CES also had lots of much more interesting new trends on the horizon.MicroLED gets smaller, closer to reality. Every TV sold today is based on either LCD or OLED panel technology, but MicroLED is a good bet to succeed them in a few years. It uses millions of individual teeny, tiny LEDs to create its image, similar to a Jumbotron. Samsung showed its engineering chops with the first version that’s small enough to imagine going on a normal wall: 75 inches at 4K resolution. That’s real progress, although no word on when (or if) it might actually go on sale.4K laser projection shoots for mainstream. Short-throw projectors can sit close to the wall and deliver massive images, and the most interesting at CES use laser light engines for brighter images (better to compete with room light) without the need to replace bulbs. LG’s CineBeam HU80K and Optoma’s P1 build in audio for the complete “TV” experience, and Hisense showed a 3-laser prototype with unprecedented color claims.57-lg-booth-tvs-ces2019LG’s short-throw 4K laser projector can show a 120-inch image from 7 inches away. Sarah Tew/CNET 2 LCD panels = 2,073,600 dimming zones. Hisense showed an LCD TV that uses two separate liquid crystal panels — one black-and-white 1080p and one color 4K — along with a full-array backlight to improve contrast. Typical local dimming TVs have a few hundred zones or maybe 1,000 at best, but Hisense claims that every pixel of the 1080p panel, more than 2 million, effectively acts as a local dimming zone. Combined with 2,900 nits of light output, that’s potentially the best image LCD image quality yet. I saw the demo in person and it looked good enough, but couldn’t get a real sense of its potential in the crowded booth. Hisense’s rep said he hoped to bring it to market in the US. We’ll see.06-vizio-p-series-quantum-65-inchVizio unleashed more TVs with better picture quality specifications than ever. Sarah Tew/CNET Today’s TVs? Better picture, more competitionSo what about the TVs mere mortals can afford, you ask? There was plenty of promising info about those, too.Vizio’s full lineup looks better than ever. Vizio has lost share to TCL over the last couple of years, and it’s fighting back in 2019 with a strong-looking lineup. Local dimming everywhere, of course, but also quantum dots in the mainstream M-Series, more dimming zones and, in the flagship P-Series Quantum X series, enough brightness to match the Sonys and Samsungs of the world. TCL gets bigger. The biggest Chinese TV brand in the US added a 75-inch size for an aggressive $1,800 to the CNET Editors’ Choice 6 series. On the other hand TCL didn’t announce any specific new models for 2019 — saving that info, like Samsung, for spring.  13:20 Hisense does cheaper local dimming Roku TV. The China-based TV unleashed its own slew of sets complete with pricing, and the most promising looks like the R8 series. It has a healthy 64 zones of dimming on the 65-inch size, wide color gamut, 700 nits of brightness and Dolby Vision, all for less than the TCL 6 series. Shipping “later in 2019” the 55-inch size costs $600, while the 65 is an aggressive $750. More local dimming everywhere. With the advent of HDR my favorite LCD TV tech enhancement, full-array local dimming, is appearing in more and more TVs. All three of the budget brands above are selling FALD TVs, Sony introduced yet another in the promising X950G series, and Samsung said it would have more FALD models than ever in 2019. That means more competition in the mid-priced picture-quality-for-the-buck race, always my favorite part of the TV market.09-vizio-apple-airplaySoon your iPhone will play nice with Vizio, LG and Sony TVs. Sarah Tew/CNET Mr. Smart TV goes to CupertinoIn the biggest surprise of the show, basically every big TV company announced that its sets would work with Apple in some way, starting this spring. Samsung seems like the biggest winner — its 2018 and 2019 TVs are the only one that get actual on-screen version of the iTunes Movies and TV app. But Sony, LG and Vizio get to play nice with Apple devices too. All three (along with Samsung) can work with the AirPlay 2 system, which uses iPhones, iPads or Mac computers to control video, music and photo playback on the TV. We got the full demo in Vizio’s booth.That’s it for the major TV news out of CES 2019. In closing, here’s a little something to remind you that TV technology can still amaze: LG’s OLED waterfall in 360 video (courtesy of Geoffrey Morrison) and still images. Enjoy. $999 The best TVs at CES 2019last_img read more

first_img $319 The standard Nintendo Switch may gain a pair of siblings this summer, and one might lose the docking feature. James Martin/CNET Nintendo may be Switch-ing up its console options as soon as this summer, offering cut-down and souped-up models to appeal to a wide range of gamers.The Japanese gaming company will launch two new versions of the Nintendo Switch, according to the Wall Street Journal’s Monday report, which cited anonymous sources within the supply chain and game developers with access to a prototype. Eurogamer backed up this report on Tuesday, citing sources close to Nintendo.One will be a cheaper option for casual players. This is inspired by its 2DS, which was released as a budget alternative to the 3DS in 2016. It may remove the Switch’s signature docking feature (in which case it wouldn’t connect to a TV the same way and could be portable-only) and it’ll be tougher than the standard model to ensure that it’s “kid-proof,” according to Eurogamer.Removing the docking feature might seem like a massive shift for the console, but similar things have happened. Nintendo cut the 3DS’ signature stereoscopic 3D for the 2DS.It may also remove the HD Rumble controller vibration and other features to cut costs, the Journal reported. Review • Xbox One X review: Is it worthy of the hype? Now playing: Watch this: The other new Switch will apparently be a more powerful version of the existing model, which will target avid gamers but won’t reach the power levels of Sony’s PS4 Pro or Microsoft’s Xbox One X. The performance jump will be like the one from its original 2011 3DS handheld to the New 3DS (which had a better display and buttons), Eurogamer reported.Both might include new liquid-crystal display (LCD) screens from Sharp, the Journal noted.We’ve previously heard reports about Nintendo planning to refresh its console for the summer, and that it was planning a cheaper model. It may reveal the new versions during E3 in June, and bring them out in the following months, according to the Journal.Neither Nintendo nor Sharp immediately responded to requests for comment.First published March 25 at 3:47 a.m. PT.Updated March 26 at 4:05 a.m. PT: Adds details from Eurogamer report. Consoles Gaming What we want to see in the new Nintendo Switch $369 Amazon See it 3:19 Share your voice 29 Photos The 29 best games on the Nintendo Switch Preview • Xbox One X coming November 7 for $499: Everything we know Microsoft Xbox One X Mentioned Above Microsoft Xbox One X 3 Comments Tags CNET may get a commission from retail offers. See It Microsoft Sony Nintendolast_img read more

first_img Expandable storage Up to 512GB See It iPhone XS Not disclosed Display size, resolution Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors The new Galaxy S10 sports three rear cameras instead of the two on the iPhone XS and the one on the Pixel 3. Angela Lang/CNET The Galaxy S10 was heavily leaked for months, but on Wednesday at the Unpacked event in San Francisco, Samsung made things official by announcing the four new phones: Galaxy S10, S10 Plus, S10 5G and budget S10E. The new phone features a 6.1-inch AMOLED screen with a hole-punch notch called the Galaxy O display. The fingerprint reader has moved from the back to the front and is now built into the display. The Galaxy S10 with its Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 is — on paper — the most powerful Android phone. But it has to contend with Apple’s iPhone XS and its blazing fast A12 processor, and the Google Pixel 3 which has arguably one of the best still cameras on any phone today and costs $100 less.Editor’s note, March 13, 2019: Our Galaxy S10 Plus review and our Galaxy S10E review are both now live. Keep reading for more about the Galaxy S10, S10 E, S10 Plus and Galaxy S10 5G. And here’s more about the Galaxy Fold, Samsung’s first foldable phone.To see how these phones compare, check out the spec chart below. $999 (64GB), $1,149 (256GB), $1,349 (512GB) Yes Galaxy S10 vs. iPhone XS, Pixel 3 specs 5.7 x 2.7 x 0.3 in Octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 128GB, 512GB 7-megapixel with Face ID 5.7 x 2.8 x 0.3 in 2,915 mAh Now playing: Watch this: Weight (Ounces, Grams) 5.9 x 2.77 x 0.31 in See it Front-facing camera 12.2-megapixel Google Pixel 3 RAM 8GB 145.6 x 68.2 x 7.9 mm Apple A12 Bionic Dimensions (Inches) 5.53 oz.; 157 g Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Google Pixel 3 News • Unlocked Google Pixel 3: Just $499.99 with this exclusive code £799 10-megapixel Review • Pixel 3 review: The best Android phone of 2018 Processor Special features See It Android 9 Pie Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 (2.5GHz + 1.6GHz octa-core) Galaxy S10 vs. iPhone XS: How do they compare? Comments Preview • Pixel 3 and 3 XL: Google’s nicest Pixel might lack that killer feature 13 Pixel density IPX8, wireless charging support, Pixel Buds USB-C headphones in the box 64GB, 256GB, 512GB Price off-contract (USD) 149.9 x 70.4 x 7.8 mm 5.8-inch Super Retina OLED; 2,436×1,125 pixels Back cover Phones None 6.1-inch AMOLED; 3,040×1,440-pixels Price (GBP) iOS 12 Tags None Price (AUD) $799 Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? 5.5-inch “flexible” OLED; 2,280×1,080 pixels 3,400mAhcenter_img Storage 458ppi Mobile software • 6.2 oz; 177 g Headphone jack Dimensions (Millimeters) Dual 12-megapixel No None (Face ID) 64 Photos 4K Walmart 4K Lightning Share your voice $799 (64GB); $899 (128GB) 4GB AU$1,349 £999 (64GB), £1,149 (256GB), £1,349 (512GB) 64GB, 128GB Not disclosed, but Apple claims it will last 30 min. longer than iPhone X Samsung Galaxy S10 5.2 oz; 148 g Galaxy S10, S10 Plus, S10E: Every camera lens and curve $849 Wireless PowerShare; hole punch screen notch; water resistant (IP68); Fast Wireless Charging 2.0 Battery Sprint 4:13 Dual 8-megapixel Video capture 143.6 x 70.9 x 7.7 mm £739 (64GB); £839 (128GB) In-screen See It USB-C Best Buy 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 16-megapixel (ultra wide-angle), 12-megapixel (telephoto) Android 9.0 with Samsung One UI Mentioned Above Google Pixel 3 (64GB, not pink) Water-resistant (IP68); dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM); wireless charging; Face ID; Memoji See All CNET may get a commission from retail offers. No USB-C $812 reading • Galaxy S10 vs. iPhone XS, Pixel 3: All specs compared 4K Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Fingerprint sensor 443ppi Connector $900 AU$1,199 (64GB); AU$1,349 (128GB) Apple AU$1,629 (64GB), AU$1,879 (256GB), AU$2,199 (512GB) Camera Samsung Event 550ppi $589 Google Samsung Applelast_img read more

first_img Share your voice 13 Photos Mobile Comment How to stop robocalls Now playing: Watch this: 2:42 Often the numbers that show up in caller ID are “spoofed,” meaning appear to belong to friends or neighbors. These calls hide the real number to trick people into answering the call. The FCC has adopted some policies to reduce the number of calls people get. The agency is now allowing wireless carriers to automatically block calls suspected of being unwanted robocalls. Congress is also stepping in to ensure the agency has what it needs to give its policies teeth. The FCC is hosting a series of panels at its headquarters in Washington DC on Thursday. To follow the workshop in real time, you can tune into the FCC livestream. 1 FTC The Federal Communications Commission is hosting a Robocall Summit all day Thursday to detail the progress major phone companies have made in implementing technology and policies to stop incessant robocalls. The nation’s four major wireless carriers will be there, along with industry experts. The people at the workshop all have a hand in developing the technology standard for SHAKEN/STIR, a protocol that would validate whether calls are originating where they claim to be coming from and would allow for faster tracing of illegal calls to find out who’s responsible for them. The number of robocalls, which use autodialers and recorded messages to achieve high volumes, has exploded in recent years. Americans received 47.8 billion robocalls last year, according to an FCC report released in February. Nearly 50% of those calls were from scammers. The FCC said 60 percent of the complaints it receives each year are about robocalls. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has been leading an effort to “stop the scourge of illegal robocalls.” Samsung, LG, Motorola: How soon can we expect 5G phones? Tags FCClast_img read more

first_img we said take away the mechs and you gave us ZOMBIES !?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??????!?!?— gfuel | colbeyyy (@colbeyyy) August 14, 2019 VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE VAULT BRUTE— The Fortnite Guy (@The_FortniteGuy) August 14, 2019 Tags Originally published on Aug. 14.Update, Aug. 16: Adds Epic’s response.  Gaming Share your voice Literally no one asked for this. We said to vault the mechs and you added zombies LOL— FaZe Thiefs (@Thiefs) August 14, 2019 Comment Fortnite 1 The Fortnite Brute is still around, and players aren’t happy.  Epic Games It seems some Fortnite fans are still brutalizing the Brute. Developer Epic Games released an update to Fortnite on Wednesday, hoping to address complaints about the recently introduced “mech,” or robot, that some Fortniters say is way too powerful. But critics say that the changes aren’t enough and that they won’t be satisfied until the Brute goes bye-bye. Epic responded to calls to #RemoveTheMech, saying the mech is meant for players who may not have the skill to win a game. In a Thursday post titled “Fortnite and the Brute,” Epic explained its philosophy for the battle royale game, saying that it’s for players of all skill levels. Adding the giant robot in Fortnite season 10 gave players who were struggling a “shot at that first elimination or Victory Royale,” Epic said. The developer said it’s happy with the changes it made to the mech and that Brute eliminations make up a small number of the total eliminations in a match. However, Epic’s response hasn’t stopped some Fortnite players from continuing to call for the removal for the mech. One point brought up multiple times is that the Brute should be removed from competitive matches. With the Fortnite Champion Series starting Saturday, it’s likely the mech will play a big role in the tournament. Wednesday’s update to season 10 equipped the Brute with a targeting laser — first touted last week — that gives players a heads-up when the robot is preparing to fire at them with its devastating missile launcher. It also changed the Brute’s spawn rates: The chance for the mech to spawn will now decline significantly throughout the match, meaning there’ll be fewer robots for players to find. And Epic fixed various exploits that made the Brute move faster than intended. Still, some players remain unsatisfied, and they took to social media to air their thoughts about the update.The v10.10 thread on Reddit contained hundreds of comments criticizing the decision to not “vault” the mech — or remove it entirely. The top comment simply says, “My disappointment is immeasurable and my day is ruined.”Twitter users had a similar sentiment. Prominent Fortnite players criticized Epic for adding new foes in v10.10 — the zombie-like Fiends — instead of getting rid of the Brute. last_img read more