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first_img Related Content News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 04, 2019 Aidoc Announces CE Mark for AI-based Pulmonary Embolism Workflow Tool Artificial intelligence (AI) radiology solution provider Aidoc announced the commercial release of its CE-marked… read more Technology | Interventional Radiology | June 24, 2019 Mentice and Siemens Healthineers Integrate VIST Virtual Patient With Artis Icono Angiography System Siemens Healthineers and Mentice AB announced the collaboration to fully integrate Mentice’s VIST Virtual Patient into… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 11, 2019 Mednax National Cardiac Centers of Excellence Program Highlighted at SCCT 2019 Mednax Inc. and Mednax Radiology Solutions announced that Chief Medical Officer Ricardo C. Cury, M.D., FSCCT, will… read more The new IMIXhorizon SomaRad DR system is designed for smaller facilities that require a compact, affordable DR solution. The SomaRad features fully motorized positioning, remote control functionality, and high image quality. In addition, this new general radiography system requires only 8 feet of ceiling height clearance, making it ideal for smaller clinics. The new IMIXhorizon ChiroRad DR system is created to address workflow challenges within a chiropractic environment. The ChiroRad, the first entry from IMIX Americas into the chiropractic market, offers a compact, sleek system at an affordable price. It features two motorized stands for tube and detector, providing superior image quality and reliability. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 24, 2019 WVU Medicine Installs First Alphenix 4D CT in the U.S. The West Virginia University (WVU) Heart and Vascular Institute is the first hospital in the country to acquire the… read more News | Advanced Visualization | February 25, 2019 Philips and Microsoft Showcase Augmented Reality for Image-Guided Minimally Invasive Therapies Philips will unveil a new mixed reality concept developed together with Microsoft that the company says is designed for… read more 360 Photos | Angiography | May 17, 2019 360 View Inside a Cath/EP Lab at Baylor Heart Hospital This is a view inside one of the 11 cath labs at … read more center_img Philips and Microsoft have partnered to develop an augmented reality system to help imporve workflow and procedural navigation in the cath lab. Physicians wearing visors can view and interact with true 3-D holograms above the patient on the table and manipulate the image with voice and hand motion commands to avoid breaking the sterile field.  Technology | Radiation Dose Management | May 23, 2019 ControlRad Announces FDA Clearance and Launch of ControlRad Trace ControlRad Inc. announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted 510(k) clearance for its ControlRad… read more Technology | Radiation Dose Management | April 04, 2019 Omega Medical Imaging Launches AI-enabled FluoroShield for Radiation Reduction The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Omega Medical Imaging 510(k) clearance to offer their artificial… read more Technology | Angiography | March 01, 2019 iSchemaView Launches RAPID Angio iSchemaView announced the release of RAPID Angio, a complete neuroimaging solution for the angiography suite that… read more Technology | November 12, 2008 DR System Addresses Small Facility Needs Technology | Mobile C-Arms | February 18, 2019 Philips Launches Zenition Mobile C-arm Platform Philips announced the launch of Philips Zenition, its new mobile C-arm imaging platform. Mobile C-arms are X-ray… read morelast_img read more

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first_img Information-based decision-making is critical to physicians in delivering quality care and ensuring efficiency in today’s health care systems.Patient data must be available and used for effective decision-making. Yet, because it exists in various systems across numerous healthcare providers, this information is not always readily available to clinicians. While the integration of various systems can enable new levels of efficiency, few organizations have been able to overcome the challenges of departmental information silos and internal inoperability. Achieving actual healthcare information integration continues to be a goal rather than a reality, even for the largest and most technically advanced entities.Radiology Connects to the Enterprise Among clinical disciplines, radiology offers the most significant potential for quick wins associated with cross-enterprise integration. Radiology images and reports are critical components of a patient’s medical history. Ensuring that all care providers have easy access to radiology information can help reduce costs by minimizing duplicative scans and redundant image and report distribution. Most radiology facilities are already digital and standards-compliant and are using the digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) protocol and health level seven (HL7) messaging. This creates a solid foundation for integrating data from radiology information systems (RIS)/picture archive and communication systems (PACS) into other programs. This also makes electronic clinical decision support a more accessible solution.Custom vs. Best-Practices Approach Organizations seeking to integrate a PACS and electronic health records (EHR) often struggle with a fundamental choice: should they develop custom interfaces or rely on a best-practices approach? In this case, the best-practices method employs standards-based frameworks from the Integrated Healthcare Enterprise. Using standards-based connectivity, open-Web architecture and rapid-development approaches, an either/or scenario, is no longer necessary. Blending standards-based approaches with customization can yield efficiencies ­— and can be achieved quickly. This can be done without requiring information duplication, changes to established workflow or costly upgrades to existing, individual systems.Five Tips to Integration When considering the integration of RIS/PACS and EHR solutions, organizations should consider the following five key elements to optimize immediate value. • Plan for best-of-breed solution architecture • Minimize impact on existing care workflow • Keep the patient experience in mind • Leverage current standards compliance • Consider the Web as an integration conduitBest-of-Breed Environment Multivendor, multigeneration solution topology is a reality for most health care environments. This is particularly true for diagnostic imaging solutions for cardiology, orthopedics and oncology. The forklift replacement strategy, which involves enforcing an enterprise PACS design across all departments, is neither cost-effective nor practical from a time perspective. Typically, this approach comes with a long implementation and change in management cycle, as well as a hefty price tag.In practice, most hospitals and health systems have several departmental PACS and information systems, such as RIS, cardiovascular information systems (CVIS) and so on. Each one needs to interact with the EHR in the hospital as well as outpatient clinics and referring practices.An effective integration approach requires an architectural design that accounts for such multivendor, multisystem integration. Mastering the reality of such a best-of-breed environment not only helps to avoid an expensive technology project but also minimizes the impact of radical change management across multiple sites.Minimize Downtime In clinical environments, a common barrier to system adoption and integration is disruption of an established care workflow. Effective integration rests on the ability to eliminate or minimize disruption to care delivery, while enabling exchange of information among silos of transactional care. The time-critical nature of the workflow in the emergency department (ED) or highly specific needs of a cardiology department, for example, is reflected in best-practices and processes already in place at the facility. As such, it is essential to minimize impact on these workflows.In addition to established processes, many healthcare systems have invested heavily in putting a working IT infrastructure in place. Any solution that enables information sharing should leverage this infrastructure rather than impose costly hardware upgrades or major data migration initiatives. From both process and user perspectives, integration needs to be minimally disruptive to the technical infrastructure and as seamless and invisible as possible to clinicians who rely on established care workflow.Keep the Patient in Mind Quite often, consideration for the patient’s experience can get lost in the context of integration. In planning an effective integration, organizations must account for individual care experiences as well as the complete picture across the continuum of care. The ability for clinicians to make quick and informed decisions throughout the care cycle impacts the quality of care and enables more cost-effective health delivery. Perhaps most importantly, patients will appreciate having the fastest possible delivery of care. Streamlining information exchange between various stakeholders in a care episode eliminates repeat order verification, duplicate screening forms and redundant insurance validation. This, in turn, minimizes the amount of time each specialist, including radiologists, spends on nondiagnostic tasks. Additionally, this creates a positive health care experience for the patient. Designing cross-enterprise integration with the patient experience in mind enables more effective care and builds a higher degree of patient confidence in care providers. In today’s health care landscape, the importance of customer service cannot be overlooked.Current Standards Compliance Broad adoption of DICOM and HL7 standards in a modern healthcare enterprise delivers the shortest path to an effective information exchange. Standards-based interoperability virtually guarantees minimal impact on existing systems and care workflows. With these standards in place, RIS/PACS and EHR systems can reconcile patient identity information, synchronize order data and exchange diagnostic results — without the need to build additional interfaces or alter the existing systems landscape in any given practice. Relying exclusively on established standards, IHE integration profiles outline a valuable foundation to fully enable cross-enterprise integration. Standards-based interfacing allows for quick integration of various systems and facilitates information sharing without requiring a costly and time-consuming integration project.The Web as an Integration Conduit The infrastructure component for an effective integration is readily available with high-volume bandwidth and Web access via multiple devices, including mobile phones. As a public information backbone, the Internet offers an ideal communication line for health data exchange. Robust Web services architecture, wide acceptance of the software-as-a-service (SaaS) model for business-critical solutions and security for managing Web data are the necessary elements of an ideal data exchange. Web services wrapping can be implemented effectively and quickly, based on existing interoperability standards and without high development cost. In a matter of days or weeks, an integrator can include information from any number of systems and offer data as a part of a portal, a mobile application or as part of any system. The Web connects all stakeholders and maximizes the value of investments in existing systems, while enabling new opportunities to access critical care information through open-systems architecture.Cross-enterprise system integration also requires proper planning and knowledge of common issues and obstacles that may arise. The integration will face an uphill battle if it overlooks existing legacy systems, forces unnecessary change to existing care workflows and avoids focusing on the patient experience. The approach must leverage standards-based interfacing while supporting a Web-based infrastructure. Moving to a more integrated environment has the potential to improve what matters most: the quality and cost-effectiveness of care delivery and optimized health for the patient.Antonia Wells is executive vice president of R&D for Merge Healthcare, a provider of health IT solutions. Wells has more than 25 years of business management experience, including leadership roles in information technology, enterprise system implementation and process re-engineering. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | August 01, 2019 DrChrono Teams With DeepScribe to Automate Medical Note Taking in EHR DrChrono Inc. and DeepScribe announced a partnership so medical practices using DrChrono EHR can use artificial… read more center_img News | Radiology Business | August 01, 2019 Philips Completes Acquisition of Carestream Health’s HCIS Business … read more Related Content Feature | August 26, 2010 | Antonia Wells, executive vice-president of R&D, Merge Healthcare Five Top Considerations for PACS-EHR Integration Blend a standards-based and customized approach for efficient PACS-EHR integration Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more A nurse examines a patient in the Emergency Department of Cincinnati Children’s, where researchers successfully tested artificial intelligence-based technology to improve patient recruitment for clinical trials. Researchers report test results in the journal JMIR Medical Informatics. Image courtesy of Cincinnati Children’s. News | Artificial Intelligence | July 31, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Solution Improves Clinical Trial Recruitment Clinical trials are a critical tool for getting new treatments to people who need them, but research shows that… read morelast_img read more

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first_img News | Information Technology | June 25, 2019 Barco Launches Smart Solution for Remote Radiology Reading Barco’s new remote radiology reading solution ensures dependable imaging when radiologists are working outside the ho read more News | PACS Accessories | May 28, 2019 Intelerad Showcases Clario SmartWorklist at SIIM 2019 The Clario SmartWorklist intelligently manages picture archiving and communication system (PACS) reading workflow by… read more News | Remote Viewing Systems | June 04, 2019 Client Outlook’s eUnity Smartviewer Selected by Duke University Health System Client Outlook Inc. announced that Duke University Health System has implemented eUnity for enterprise viewing… read more News | PACS | May 22, 2019 Brazil’s Santa Casa Hospital System Chooses Carestream for Unified Diagnostic Workflow Santa Casa de Misericordia has selected Carestream to replace its legacy diagnostic workflow technology across all… read more News | Remote Viewing Systems | July 16, 2019 Anatomage Releases Anatomage Cloud Platform Anatomage Inc. released an update to the Anatomage Cloud platform that allows medical and dental professionals to… read more News | PACS | June 07, 2019 PaxeraHealth Wins Four New PACS Projects in Chile Picture archiving and communication system/radiology information system (PACS/RIS) developer PaxeraHealth has won four… read more News | PACS Accessories | June 13, 2019 M*Modal and Community Health Network Partner on AI-powered Clinical Documentation M*Modal announced that the company and Community Health Network (CHNw) are collaborating to transform the patient-… read more Technology | August 07, 2012 ClearCanvas Releases Image Sharing Products Technology | Artificial Intelligence | May 13, 2019 FDA Approves Zebra Medical Vision’s HealthPNX AI Chest X-ray Triage Product Zebra Medical Vision has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for HealthPNX, an artificial… read more Related Content News | Remote Viewing Systems | May 01, 2019 University of Toronto Partners With IMS for Emergency Radiology Simulation International Medical Solutions (IMS) and the University of Toronto Department of Medical Imaging have signed a… read more August 7, 2012 — ClearCanvas Inc. announced the release of two new workstation products designed to assist with image sharing. ClearCanvas ShareAgent is a routing application that allows healthcare professionals to transfer medical images to any DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine)-enabled device, and ClearCanvas ShareStation is a comprehensive mini-PACS (picture archiving and communications system) solution. Both products are based on ClearCanvas’ workstation development platform and operate on standard computer hardware.ClearCanvas ShareAgent seamlessly blends the capabilities of a basic diagnostic workstation with routing capabilities normally found in a complete PACS. Designed for distributed imaging centers where diagnostic images are captured at one facility, yet reported or archived at another, the system allows for fast and secure transmission of health information.ShareAgent can also be implemented as a basic quality assurance (QA) workstation for technologists and radiologists to review patient studies before they are sent off for reporting. A basic DICOM editor allows users to correct inaccurate patient information found in DICOM tags. ShareAgent includes a comprehensive set of networking features protocols, including DICOM Send/Receive, Query/Retrieve and Move. Routing rules can be quickly configured to automatically distribute medical images based on a variety of criteria including Modality, Referring Physician, Study Description and Institution Name, amongst other rules. Various forms of lossy and lossless compression in the solution can be applied to different studies to accelerate transmission times. For optimal network usage, ShareAgent also allows routing to be scheduled during off-peak hours when network activity is at its lowest. Emergency STAT cases can be immediately transferred through a variety of manual overrides in the system. ShareAgent also can be deployed in hosted environments to support vendors offering software-as-a-service (SaaS)-based solutions.ClearCanvas ShareStation is a complete mini-PACS solution designed for medical imaging facilities that perform less than 5,000 studies per year. ShareStation does not require the use of costly servers to operate, and it incorporates a variety of advanced diagnostic features for radiologists, including multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), hanging protocols, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) image fusion with standardized uptake value (SUV), media burning, spine labelling, digital subtraction imaging, and ClearCanvas’ Easel function (where relevant priors are automatically loaded for each patient study). A variety of routing capabilities are similarly integrated into the system that supports communication with any DICOM device. Routing functions are managed through an activity monitor that allows users with little networking experience to easily send and receive medical images from their workstation interface.ClearCanvas’ ShareAgent and ShareStation share a standardized graphic user interface (GUI) with the company’s other workstation products (Workstation, Chirostation and Vetstation).”Image sharing has become an increasingly important function in healthcare,” said Norman Young, president and CEO of ClearCanvas Inc. “From external specialists that need access to diagnostic images to other referring physicians, collaborative approaches have placed a high demand for secure, easy-to-use routing capabilities. ShareAgent and ShareStation represent our company’s initial workstation offerings in this area, which will be expanded in subsequent releases.”ClearCanvas’ standards-based development platform allows ShareAgent and ShareStation to communicate with image archives and workstations from other vendors. They are currently available from a variety of authorized resellers around the world.For more information: www.clearcanvas.ca FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more last_img read more

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first_img Advances in long-length digital radiography are creating opportunities for visualization during spinal surgery, as well as pre- and post-operatively. Image courtesy of Fujifilm Medical Systems August 21, 2012 — Radisphere announced the launch of the Radiology Quality Institute (RQI). The RQI is a collaborative research organization dedicated to the identification and promotion of radiology quality standards and process improvements in order to improve healthcare delivery.The RQI has a focused research agenda to identify and implement technology and workflow innovations that deliver measurable improvements to radiology processes in areas that include interpretative accuracy, appropriate utilization, peer review, concurrence review, critical findings communication, consultations, turnaround time and interventional radiology.With access to Radisphere’s extensive data and analytics obtained from working with 35 hospitals and more than 10,000 clinicians, the RQI is focused on the cooperative establishment of performance and process benchmarks that can help deliver measurable improvements and innovations to radiology services.“The Radiology Quality Institute was founded on the same principles that led Radisphere to implement quality standards and processes that drive quality, encourage transparency and increase accountability,” said Frank Seidelmann, DO, co-founder and chief medical officer of Radisphere. “By making our data available for the study of process improvement, the RQI hopes to transform the way healthcare is delivered and measured for the benefit of the ultimate end user — the patient.”The RQI also will administer quality improvement programs consistent with Radisphere’s “just culture” approach, sharing best practices that can increase accountability and performance measures.“To date, there is no universally accepted set of standards that hospitals or health systems can use to accurately measure diagnostic radiology performance (outside of mammography), which makes it difficult to identify the performance of radiology services,” said Seidelmann. “By sharing performance benchmark data, the RQI will provide a collaborative, educational resource for organizations seeking to improve the delivery of radiology services.”For more information: www.radiologyqualityinstitute.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Technology | Quality Assurance (QA) | July 10, 2019 IBA Launches Monte Carlo Patient QA for Varian Halcyon at AAPM 2019 IBA announced the launch of the latest functionality of the SciMoCa Monte Carlo Patient QA solution at the 61st annual… read more Related Content News | Radiology Imaging | July 22, 2019 AHRA and Canon Medical Systems Support the 12th Annual Putting Patients First Program For the past twelve years, Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. has partnered with read more News | August 21, 2012 Radisphere Launches Radiology Quality Institute to Identify, Promote Quality Standards, Process Improvements Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Body language expert Traci Brown spoke at the AHRA 2019 meeting on how to identify when a person is not being honest by their body language. She said medical imaging department administrators can use this knowledge to help in hiring decisions and managing staff.  Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough discusses bridging diversity gaps in medical physicsPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:05Loaded: 2.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July. center_img Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more News | Radiation Dose Management | July 09, 2019 Radcal Exhibits Accu-Gold Touch Systems at AAPM 2019 Radcal Corp. will be presenting the new Accu-Gold Touch platform, a multi-analyzer the company says is the latest in X-… read more Feature | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 19, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr DR Advances Promote Imaging of Whole Spine Recent advances in… read more Feature | Radiology Business | July 23, 2019 | Greg Freiherr Liars in Radiology Beware! Can you tell when someone is lying? read more Videos | AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McColl… read more Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Feature | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Imaging Market in U.S. Could Rise In Coming Years The coming years may be good for the medical imaging community in the United States. But they will not be easy. read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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first_img Harry Ameredes, M.D., president and practicing radiologist. Harry Ameredes, M.D., president and practicing radiologist. Carolina Regional Radiology at Angier Imaging Center.Serving a 10-county region in southeastern North Carolina, Carolina Regional Radiology (CRR) is a full-service imaging and interventional radiology practice. Based in Fayetteville, N.C., and performing 500,000 exams annually, the practice has 22 board-certified radiologists who provide radiology services to several hospitals and imaging centers, as well as numerous physician practices and clinics.Technology Drivers EnableRemarkable 25 Percent Growth During National DeclineAs business at imaging centers declines 2 to 7 percent annually, CRR is achieving same-shop annual growth of nearly 25 percent at each of its three outpatient centers and is currently experiencing month over month procedure gains that are its highest ever. Annual growth in CRR’s mammography business has skyrocketed 40 percent, despite a national trend of 10 to 15 percent decline for this modality.This remarkable growth is due in large part to CRR’s decision to adopt leading-edge technology solutions, enabling it to streamline workflow, enhance patient care and improve the bottom line. “There is no question that technology has driven the success of our outpatient facility,” says Sheryl Jordan, M.D., a former CRR breast imager now working as clinical faculty in breast imaging at the UNC Department of Radiology.  Intelerad Software Offers Superior Solution to Streamline WorkflowIn late 2009, CRR reviewed several leading radiology software solutions. CRR President Harry Ameredes, M.D., explains, “We serve many different imaging centers and hospitals, and we needed a solution which allowed us to integrate multiple modalities from several different facilities into one, single workflow.” Due to the critical nature of the new technology selection, the process was comprehensive. “We vetted the vendors quite thoroughly,” said Ameredes, “until Intelerad was the only one standing.” In 2010, CRR deployed Intelerad’s IntelePACS, the KLAS Ambulatory PACS category-leader, and InteleOne, a distributed unified reading solution. Outstanding product capabilities and Intelerad’s comprehensive integration with other radiology software products were key factors in the decision. In addition, Ameredes praises the company’s philosophy of ongoing innovation and the intuitive nature of its products. He is confident that the Intelerad platform will meet the practice’s future requirements. “We chose this vendor with long-term strategy in mind,” Ameredes said. Template-Based Reporting Reduces Turnaround Time from Days to MinutesIn 2011, building on the streamlined workflow and other operational improvements facilitated by IntelePACS and InteleOne, CRR deployed Intelerad’s Multi-Method Reporting (MMR) module. MMR blends dictation, voice recognition and structured reports into a single, streamlined interface and workflow.Jordan praises the ease with which templates can be created and revised using MMR. “The breast imaging templates are clear, compliant with ACR/MQSA, and correct,” she said. “They are concise and quick. As a result, they have been extremely well-received.” The move to structured reporting using MMR has had extremely positive, far-reaching impact across the practice. “Multi-Method Reporting has significantly improved our turnaround time from days to minutes for all engaged modalities,” said Ameredes.Intelerad Multi-Method Reporting Leads to 55 Percent Productivity Increases MMR’s templates and voice recognition has enabled CRR radiologists to post impressive, measurable efficiency gains, as measured by work relative value units (wRVUs). Compared to national benchmarks of 65 and 69 wRVUs per radiologist — as reported by RBMA and Medical Management Professionals, respectively — CRR radiologists now average nearly 80 wRVUs using Intelerad’s software.Further, the ability to achieve daily average wRVUs of 85.2 within CRR’s breast imaging program — a year-over-year increase of 55 percent — is even more astounding given the additional responsibility that breast imagers speak personally with patients, consult with referring physicians and perform breast interventional procedures.Improved Services Lead to Increased Market ShareThe improved, technology-driven processes at CRR are gaining the attention of the physician and patient community in southeastern North Carolina. With CRR’s enhanced ability to deliver efficient, high-quality patient care, Jordan said, “We have captured market share from our competitors.”Case study supplied by Intelerad FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Case Study | May 14, 2013 | Sponsored by Intelerad Carolina Regional Radiology Achieves Remarkable Growth Practice leverages unified workflow, template-based reporting and voice recognition to achieve 55 percent productivity gains and 25 percent growth Related Content News | Mammography Reporting Software | July 26, 2019 Ikonopedia Releases Automated Combined Reporting Package at AHRA Ikonopedia showcased its recently released Automated Combined Reporting package and its entire suite of structured… read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Carolina Regional Radiology at Angier Imaging Center. News | Breast Imaging | August 02, 2019 Volpara to Distribute Screenpoint Medical’s Transpara AI Solution Volpara Solutions and ScreenPoint Medical BV signed an agreement under which Volpara will sell ScreenPoint’s Transpara… read more Sheryl Jordan, M.D., formerly with breast imaging and intervention, Women’s Imaging. Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay 12PreviousNext Feature | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Imaging Market in U.S. Could Rise In Coming Years The coming years may be good for the medical imaging community in the United States. But they will not be easy. read more Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Technology | Mammography Reporting Software | July 25, 2019 Hologic Partners With MagView to Develop Unifi EQUIP Solution Hologic announced a partnership with mammography information solutions provider MagView to develop Unifi EQUIP, an… read morelast_img read more

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first_img The ScanTrainer transvaginal simulator is one example of Intelligent Ultrasound’s simulation technologies. News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 05, 2019 Digital Health Devices Used at Point of Care May Improve Diagnostic Certainty A West Virginia-based rural medical outreach event showcased the use of point-of-care technology in an ambulatory… read more Related Content Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 09, 2019 360 Degree View of a Mitral Valve Ultrasound Exam on a Vivid E95 System A view of a mitral valve on a GE Healthcare Vivid E95 … read more News | Ultrasound Women’s Health | July 11, 2019 FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 3D Auto RV application image courtesy of Philips Healthcare News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 31, 2019 Studies Confirm Clinical Value of ShearWave Elastography for Liver Fibrosis Evaluation SuperSonic Imagine announced the publication of the results of its prospective multicentric clinical study conducted in… read more center_img October 1, 2013 — SuperSonic Imagine’s Aixplorer MultiWave Ultrasound system, first cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2009, has received FDA clearance for the quantification capabilities of its real-time ShearWave Elastography (SWE).Aixplorer’s UltraFast imaging platform images up to 200 times faster than conventional ultrasound, making it the only system in the world that can, in real-time, generate shear waves in tissue and simultaneously image and compute the velocity of these waves.Since shear wave velocity is directly related to tissue stiffness, ShearWave Elastography is a technological breakthrough in medical imaging as it permits noninvasive electronic palpation, even in deep, hard to reach organs.This electronic palpation displays real-time, quantitative (kPa) tissue elasticity on a color-coded map and aids physicians in their diagnostic process, as tissue stiffness varies with the severity of pathology.ShearWave Elastography imaging also provides additional clinical advantages for ultrasound-guided procedures, evaluation of multifocal stiff tissue, dynamic analysis of elasticity changes and longitudinal follow-up of tissue abnormalities and treatment.“The clearance of this unique quantification tool for our real-time elastography technology is the result of a close and proactive interaction between the FDA and the company, to substantiate scientific evidence of our product performance,” said Claude Cohen-Bacrie, executive vice president of SuperSonic Imagine. “ShearWave Elastography has been used around the world since 2009 and there are over 50 major publications in several different organs, supporting the clinical benefits of this technique as an adjunct to ultrasound imaging. SWE has been studied extensively in the breast and a large, multicenter clinical trial has demonstrated its added value for lesion characterization.[1] In addition, ShearWave Elastography allows the user to locate stiff nodules in multi-nodule thyroid goiters, to assess the different stages of fibrosis in the liver and to visualize stiff areas in the peripheral zone of the prostate. We are thrilled that American physicians now have access to this invaluable diagnostic tool and we believe the clinical benefits of the Aixplorer will strengthen their medical practices,” he continued.Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., attending radiologist and investigator stated that, “Being able to actually quantify tissue stiffness in kilopascals, and in a real-time imaging tool, gives clinicians very precise information about the tissue they are scanning. In the case of breast imaging, quantification brings us higher specificity to better evaluate lesions. This translates into better lesion classification that can help avoid some unnecessary biopsies. It can also help us to recognize the need for a biopsy for what was thought to be a probably benign mass.”Aixplorer’s real-time, quantitative ShearWave Elastography can be seen at SRU in October, AASLD and the RSNA in November 2013.For more information: www.supersonicimagine.frReferences1. BE1 clinical study : ShearWave Elastography Improves the Specificity of Breast Ultrasound: The BE1 Multinational Study of 939 masses. Berg WA et al. Radiology 2012. Summary available here. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Technology | October 01, 2013 FDA Clears Aixplorer’s Real-Time ShearWave Elastography to Quantify Tissue Elasticity Ultrasound system for breast, liver, thyroid, prostate and other organs enables electronic palpation that displays real-time, quantitative tissue elasticity on a color-coded map News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 26, 2019 Intelligent Ultrasound Group Collaborating With the National Imaging Academy Wales Artificial intelligence (AI)-based ultrasound software and simulation company Intelligent Ultrasound Group plc (AIM:… read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 08, 2019 360 Degree View of an Echocardiography Exam on the SC2000 System This is a 360 degree view of a live cardiac echo demonstration for the Siemens Healthineers Acuson SC2000… read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019 360 Degree View of a Smartphone Performing a Cardiac Ultrasound Exam This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i read more Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Philips Extends Advanced Automation on Epiq CVx Cardiovascular Ultrasound Platform Philips recently announced new advanced automation capabilities on its Epiq CVx and Epiq CVxi cardiac ultrasound… read morelast_img read more

US Healthcare Facilities Have Capacity to Meet Colorectal Cancer Screening Goals

first_img CT colonography (CTC) allows visualization of the entire colon in one image. Photo courtesy of Judy Yee, M.D. July 18, 2016 — U.S. government agencies and their colorectal cancer prevention have set a goal that at least 80 percent of adults ages 50-75 will be screened for colorectal cancer. A recently published study conducted by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that the U.S. healthcare system has the capacity to make this goal a reality.To determine if the U.S. could expand its screening capacity, CDC researchers used mathematical modeling to estimate the number of colonoscopies or fecal immunochemical tests (FIT) that would be necessary every year to screen for colorectal cancer for 80 percent of adults in the recommended age group. They found that 5.1 million to 13 million colonoscopies would need to be conducted per year, depending on which screening test was first used.The analysis also used survey data from facilities that perform colonoscopies to determine the number of colonoscopies that are performed in the U.S. every year — and to calculate how many more they could do. This survey showed that 15 million colonoscopies were performed in the U.S. in 2012, and that another 10.5 million colonoscopies could be performed every year.“Colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer for men and women in the U.S., but it doesn’t have to be,” said Djenaba Joseph, M.D., MPH, medical director of the colorectal cancer control program at CDC and lead author of the paper. “Screening saves lives. The good news is that our modeling shows that the U.S. healthcare system has the potential to meet our national goal of screening 80 percent of adults ages 50-75.  Ask your doctor about screening — there are several options now.”Of the cancers affecting both men and women, colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon or rectum) is the second-leading cancer killer in the U.S., according to the CDC. Screening can find precancerous polyps — abnormal growths in the colon or rectum — so they can be removed before turning into cancer. Screening also helps find colorectal cancer at an early stage, when it is easier to treat.The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently reinforced its recommendations that adults ages 50-75 be screened for colorectal cancer.  This recommendation continues to receive USPSTF’s highest rating — an “A” grade, indicating that the evidence is convincing that screening for colorectal cancer has substantial benefits. But only a little more than half of the target population is up-to-date with screening.The new study, “Colorectal Cancer Screening: Estimated Future Colonoscopy Need and Current Volume and Capacity,” is published online in the journal Cancer.For more information: www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Colonoscopy Systems | July 12, 2017 Insurance Coverage for CT Colonography Increases Likelihood of Screening People with insurance policies that cover computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal cancer screening are… read more News | Colonoscopy Systems | August 06, 2019 Rise in Early Onset Colorectal Cancer Not Aligned With Screening Trends A new study finds that trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in… read more News | Colonoscopy Systems | September 27, 2018 Patient Groups and Doctors Tell Congress to Pass Medicare Virtual Colonoscopy Coverage … read more Related Content News | Colonoscopy Systems | April 15, 2019 Check-Cap Initiates U.S. Pilot Study of C-Scan for Colorectal Cancer Screening Check-Cap Ltd. has initiated its U.S. pilot study of the C-Scan system for prevention of colorectal cancer through… read more News | Colonoscopy Systems | September 04, 2018 Check-Cap Announces Interim Results of European Study of C-Scan System Version 3 Check-Cap Ltd. announced the interim results for its post-CE approval study of the C-Scan system Version 3, an… read more center_img Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 05, 2017 | By Jeff Zagoudis The Future of CT Colonography Screening Computed tomography colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy, offers a noninvasive alternative to… read more News | Colonoscopy Systems | July 18, 2016 U.S. Healthcare Facilities Have Capacity to Meet Colorectal Cancer Screening Goals CDC study shows facilities can reach target of 80 percent screening for adults 50-75, but only half of adults are up-to-date on screening News | Colonoscopy Systems | February 08, 2018 FDA Approves Updated Design for Recalled Pentax Duodenoscope February 8, 2018 – The U.S. read more News | Colonoscopy Systems | May 30, 2018 American Cancer Society Updates Colorectal Cancer Screening Guideline An updated American Cancer Society guideline says colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 45 for people at… read more News | Colonoscopy Systems | August 31, 2017 Infrared Colitis Screening Blood Test Could Reduce Dependence on Colonoscopy August 31, 2017 — A fast, simple blood test for ulcerative colitis using infrared spectroscopy could provide a cheape read more Technology | Colonoscopy Systems | March 27, 2017 Bracco Diagnostics Inc. Launches PROTOCO2L TOUCH Colon Insufflator for CT Colonography March 27, 2017 — Bracco Diagnostics Inc. announced the launch of its PROTOCO2L TOUCH Colon Insufflator. read morelast_img read more

BLOG Why Interoperability Is Essential When Transferring Patient

first_img News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant Greg Freiherr has reported on developments in radiology since 1983. He runs the consulting service, The Freiherr Group. A Quandary About Data TransferNonetheless, it is possible to get images – and essential patient data – intact from one facility to another. Mayo routinely does so. Over the last several years, Mayo has exchanged images with its “network care partners” using an Ambra Health “gateway.”  Not all facilities, however, are network care partners, said Kotsenas, who chairs Mayo’s radiology IT committee.The parent location of the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn., where Kotsenas works, attracts patients from around the globe. “And they may be coming from sites that don’t use Ambra Health,” she said.These patients must use other options such as patient portals or different networks for electronic transfer.  When these are not compatible, she said, “you are back to the relatively old-fashioned way of doing things — burning CDs.”Kotsenas, an associate professor of radiology at Mayo, is adamant that CDs need to be replaced by electronic transfer. Not only is the technology out of date, she said, but CDs can be lost or stolen, putting patient health information (PHI) at risk. To keep PHI safe, the data must be encrypted. “Which means whoever is on the receiving end has to be able to decrypt it,” she said. This adds another issue to the use of CDs.The answer, according to Kotsenas, is a universal architecture that supports the exchange of images. Over such a network, she said, images could be exchanged like currency on ATMs.The tricky part is getting to that point. Sponsored Content | Blog | Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant | Electronic Medical Records (EMR)| August 07, 2019 | Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant BLOG: Why Interoperability Is Essential When Transferring Patient Images Interoperability is not a barrier to the electronic transfer of medical images. Rather, it is a necessity. The trick is finding an interoperable system. And that can be difficult.Doing so in the past wasn’t an issue because interoperability wasn’t a factor. In the “old days” of radiology, patient images were analog. Film was the only means of storage and image transfer. In some ways, the old days didn’t go away. They just look different.Film as a storage medium has given way to PACS. And CDs have become the medium for transporting images from place to place. The process surrounding CDs is remarkably like that of film.Thirty-four or more years ago, patients who wanted a second opinion or were transferring care from one facility to another, drove to the hospital or clinic where past images had been taken. They asked – and waited – for their films, then physically brought them to the different facility.  A similar process is followed today when digital images are shared using CDs. Related ContentBLOG: Why You Should Not Use CDs To Transfer Patient Images#DitchtheDiskWebinar: It’s Time to Ditch the Disk: Improve Patient Care by Eliminating CDsSIIMCAST: Discless Imaging Exchange Editor’s Note: The next blog in this series will focus on the use of patient portals and how they can help in the transfer of medical images. You can read the first blog in this series, BLOG: Why You Should Not Use CDs To Transfer Patient Images, here.  News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | Radiology Business | August 01, 2019 Philips Completes Acquisition of Carestream Health’s HCIS Business … read more center_img Transferring Images ElectronicallyPatients can forego this process if they have access to an electronic network that supports medical image transfer. Some who see Amy L. Kotsenas, M.D., and her colleagues at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., use a proprietary network that links Mayo to the facilities from which they came. Other patients, however, may not be so lucky. They have to use CDs – some of which cannot be read; some that do not contain the needed images; some that are not brought at all.While interpreting a new study, Kotsenas, a neuroradiologist, said “maybe we see something that looks very serious, but we can’t tell if it’s stable or not. Without those prior images, we are missing parts of the information that we need to be able to give an accurate diagnosis.”This problem can be prevented. The technologies currently exist for doing so. They just are not in widespread use. Interoperability is the answer.Radiology arguably is in the best position of all medical specialties to make this happen. It has developed a mainstay standard, called DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine), which governs the production of digital medical images regardless of equipment vendor.Consequently, CDs might be expected to have few interoperability problems, since they store DICOM-based images. Unfortunately, the standard works best when sending images from one device to another, for example a scanner to a PACS. Trying to put images on a CD and then having those CD images ingested and read offsite can produce errors, Kotsenas said: “To expand, some CDs don’t use DICOM format and instead use non-standard formats; others use proprietary viewing software.” Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Related Content Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | August 01, 2019 DrChrono Teams With DeepScribe to Automate Medical Note Taking in EHR DrChrono Inc. and DeepScribe announced a partnership so medical practices using DrChrono EHR can use artificial… read more Greg Freiherr is a contributing editor to Imaging Technology News. Over the past three decades, he has served as business and technology editor for publications in medical imaging, as well as consulted for vendors, professional organizations, academia, and financial institutions. Feature | Information Technology | July 31, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr How Smart Devices Can Improve Efficiency Innovation is trending toward improved efficiency — but not at the expense of patient safety, according to… read morelast_img read more

CT Technique Expands Possibilities of Imaging Ancient Remains

first_img Related Content December 27, 2018 — Researchers in Sweden using computed tomography (CT) have successfully imaged the soft tissue of an ancient Egyptian mummy’s hand down to a microscopic level, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.1Non-destructive imaging of human and animal mummies with X-rays and CT has been a boon to the fields of archaeology and paleopathology, or the study of ancient diseases. Imaging studies have contributed to a better knowledge of life and death in ancient times and have the potential to improve our understanding of modern diseases.Both X-ray and conventional CT take advantage of the fact that materials absorb different amounts of X-rays. This phenomenon, known as absorption contrast, creates different degrees of contrast within an image.“For studying bone and other hard, dense materials, absorption contrast works well, but for soft tissues the absorption contrast is too low to provide detailed information,” said Jenny Romell, M.Sc., from KTH Royal Institute of Technology/Albanova University Center in Stockholm, Sweden. “This is why we instead propose propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.”Propagation-based imaging enhances the contrast of X-ray images by detecting both the absorption and phase shift that occurs as X-rays pass through a sample. The phase effect with X-rays is similar to how a ray of light changes direction as it passes through a lens. Capturing both absorption and phase shift provides higher contrast for soft tissues.“There is a risk of missing traces of diseases only preserved within the soft tissue if only absorption-contrast imaging is used,” Romell said. “With phase-contrast imaging, however, the soft tissue structures can be imaged down to cellular resolution, which opens up the opportunity for detailed analysis of the soft tissues.”Romell and colleagues evaluated phase-contrast CT by imaging a mummified human right hand from ancient Egypt. The hand, today in the collection of the Museum of Mediterranean and Near Eastern Antiquities, was brought to Sweden at the end of the 19th century, along with other mummified body parts and a fragment of mummy cartonnage (papier-mâché case). The cartonnage belonged to an Egyptian man and has been dated to around 400 BCE (before common era). They scanned the entire hand and then performed a detailed scan of the tip of the middle finger.The estimated resolution of the final images was between 6 to 9 micrometers, or slightly more than the width of a human red blood cell. Researchers were able to see the remains of adipose cells, blood vessels and nerves; they were even able to detect blood vessels in the nail bed and distinguish the different layers of the skin.“With phase-contrast CT, ancient soft tissues can be imaged in a way that we have never seen before,” Romell said.The findings point the way to a role for phase-contrast CT as an adjunct or alternative to invasive methods used in soft-tissue paleopathology that require extraction and chemical processing of the tissue. Due to their potentially destructive nature, these methods are undesirable or unacceptable for the analysis of many old and fragile specimens.“Just as conventional CT has become a standard procedure in the investigation of mummies and other ancient remains, we see phase-contrast CT as a natural complement to the existing methods,” Romell said. “We hope that phase-contrast CT will find its way to the medical researchers and archaeologists who have long struggled to retrieve information from soft tissues, and that a widespread use of the phase-contrast method will lead to new discoveries in the field of paleopathology.”For more information: www.pubs.rsna.org/journal/radiology Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 06, 2019 Canon Medical Introduces Encore Orian MR Upgrade Program Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. is helping to provide low-cost patient care solutions for its customers with the launch… read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Reference1. Romell J., Vågberg W., Romell M., et al. Soft-Tissue Imaging in a Human Mummy: Propagation-based Phase-contrast CT. Radiology, Sept. 25, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2018180945 FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Computed Tomography (CT) | December 27, 2018 CT Technique Expands Possibilities of Imaging Ancient Remains Swedish researchers use propagation-based imaging to enhance X-ray image contrast Technology | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, a subsidiary of Shimadzu Corp., announced they have received U.S. Food and Drug… read more News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | Medical 3-D Printing | August 08, 2019 RSNA and ACR to Collaborate on Landmark Medical 3D Printing Registry The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) will launch a new medical… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more last_img read more

VIDEO Virtual Endoscopic Navigation Planning Tool For Pancreatic Cancer

first_img Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:26Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:26 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Oncology View all 91 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor This is an example of a new endoscopic 3-D imaging simulator created from a patient’s computed tomography (CT) scan using Fujifilm’s Synapse 3D advanced visualization software. The feature was released at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS)  2019 meeting. The software enables surgical pre-procedural planning to assess the best entry points and angles. The software also enables users to perform a virtual peritoneal inflation using the advanced imaging platform.The software shows the anatomy color coded so structures are easier to identify and to aid navigation. In this example, a pancreatic tumor is highlighted in green, which is the target of this virtual simulation. Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Women’s Health View all 62 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Videos | Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019 VIDEO: Virtual Endoscopic Navigation Planning Tool For Pancreatic Cancer Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Information Technology View all 220 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Recent Videos View all 606 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Technology Reports View all 9 items Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items last_img read more